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The Rosetta Stone: the first political manifesto?

The Rosetta Stone: the first political manifesto?

Posted by jcm22 at Jul 18, 2014 11:45 AM |

A totemic object in the British Museum's collection, the Rosetta Stone has long fascinated linguistic scholars. But Professor Carol Hedderman of Leicester's Department of Criminology examines its political messages and sees parallels in today's criminal justice debate.

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The postcard: wish you were here?

The postcard: wish you were here?

Posted by hi29 at May 08, 2014 04:35 PM |

The postcard, a friendly hello from a far away place – or is it? Dr Sarah Hodgkinson from the Department of Criminology examines the evolution of dark tourism, and questions the moral implications of opening up tragic sites for mass consumption.

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The open door: the transition of an access student?

The open door: the transition of an access student?

Posted by hi29 at Mar 26, 2014 03:50 PM |

Access to Higher Education courses open a door to a university place for adult learners without formal academic qualifications. Researchers at Leicester’s Schools of Education and Lifelong Learning are examining how these courses change the people who step through that door.

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The AK-47: the gun of choice for revolutionaries around the world?

The AK-47: the gun of choice for revolutionaries around the world?

Posted by hi29 at May 08, 2014 05:05 PM |

What has the development of the AK-47 meant for war and violence around the world? Dr Jon Moran from the Department of Politics and International Relations examines the development of this pivotal weapon, and what its use has meant throughout history.

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The desk: a symbol of bureaucratic rule?

The desk: a symbol of bureaucratic rule?

Posted by hi29 at May 08, 2014 01:15 PM |

What does the desk mean to you? And what has it meant through history? Professor Gibson Burrell from the School of Management argues that the desk is much more than a work surface, and in fact signifies changes in power relations from the past to our contemporary world.

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The suit: a symbol of masculinity?

The suit: a symbol of masculinity?

Posted by hi29 at May 08, 2014 10:50 AM |

Is the suit a dull uniform or a vibrant fashion statement? Dr Tim Edwards from the Department of Sociology examines this question, and asserts what the suit now means for the modern day man.

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The till: helpful technology or tool of management control?

The till: helpful technology or tool of management control?

Posted by hi29 at May 06, 2014 04:10 PM |

Dr Edmund Chattoe-Brown from the Department of Sociology examines how the till is much more than something we use to pay for our shopping, and that it can in fact play a part in organisational control.

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The loaf of bread: a symbol of business inequality?

The loaf of bread: a symbol of business inequality?

Posted by hi29 at May 02, 2014 11:45 AM |

Where do you buy your daily loaf of bread? Professor Martin Parker of Leicester’s School of Management shows how this simple question can provide fresh insight into our world – and the possibility of a better one.

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The bottle of water: what does it mean to commodify a natural resource?

The bottle of water: what does it mean to commodify a natural resource?

Posted by hi29 at Mar 26, 2014 03:50 PM |

Once assumed to be unlimited in supply, water now has a greater scarcity value. Dr Georgios Patsiaouras at Leicester’s School of Management analyses the global commercialisation of water and questions the implications for consumers and the environment.

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The tin of soup: a symbol of household food insecurity?

The tin of soup: a symbol of household food insecurity?

Posted by hi29 at Mar 26, 2014 03:50 PM |

Soup – a food staple symbolising nourishment and security, but studies show food insecurity in our households is rising. Analysis by Dr Jesse Matheson, from the University of Leicester’s Department of Economics, suggests a link with rising fuel prices.

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The Social Worlds project ran from March 2014 to November 2015. This site is no longer being updated but provides an archive of all the articles which were created as part of the project.

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