I’m a migrant, but I’m the right sort of migrant’: migrant academics in Australia and New Zealand

Posted by fp74 at Feb 05, 2017 12:00 AM |
Presenter: Dr Katherine Sang, Intercultural Research Centre, Heriot Watt University, Scotland Date & Time: Wednesday 15 February 2017, 3:30pm - 5:00pmVenue: Ken Edwards Fifth Floor SR 501

Presenter: Dr Katherine Sang, Intercultural Research Centre, Heriot Watt University, Scotland
Date & Time: Wednesday 15 February 2017, 3:30pm - 5:00pm
Venue: Ken Edwards Fifth Floor SR 501

Abstract

Despite continued interest in the globalisation of higher education, comparatively little attention has been paid to the international careers of many academics. In addition, gender has frequently been ignored in any discussions of migrant academics. Women academics, in developed economies, are typically focussed in more junior posts, typically receive fewer job offers outside their institution and experience a gender pay gap which benefits their male colleagues. Through a lens of intersectionality, the current study aims to explore the experiences of migrant academics in Australia and New Zealand, understanding how gender and ethnicity may affect these experiences. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 30 academics at various stages of their careers in both Australia and New Zealand. All interviewees were social scientists employed within urban centres. The data reveal the complex patterns of (dis)advantage which characterise the experiences of migrant academics. While some migrant academics may experience disadvantage, for Anglo white male senior academics, considerable privilege is (re)produced through the migration experience. As such, this paper suggests that the lens of intersectionality benefits from considering intersecting privilege and disadvantage to reveal how privilege is maintained.

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