Evidence to support your request

Find out what evidence is needed to support your request. If you can't submit your evidence when you complete the form, you’ll need to explain why and send the evidence to us afterwards.
  • The evidence must show what the problem was, how it affected you and when
  • All evidence provided must be in English

You need to supply supporting evidence with your mitigating circumstance request. It’s your responsibility to obtain and submit this on time, we can’t seek evidence on your behalf. It’s not sufficient to verbally inform your department that you’ve been affected by a mitigating circumstance.

Examples of acceptable evidence:

Serious physical illness or accident resulting in hospitalisation or medical emergency relating to yourself Medical certificate/hospital report/report from qualified medical practitioner. These should be signed whilst the symptoms were still apparent to the medical practitioner.
Serious illness (as described above) or death of a member of your immediate family A medical report from a qualified medical practitioner or a copy of a death certificate, coroner’s report, letter from medical professional. Accompanied if necessary by formal documentation confirming relationship with the deceased.
Serious infectious disease that could put others at risk Medical certificate/hospital report/report from qualified medical practitioner. These should be signed whilst the symptoms were still apparent to the medical practitioner.
Sudden deterioration in a long-term medical condition or disability

Confirmation of your disability or long term condition

  • If you've already supplied this to the AccessAbility Centre or your department, further evidence will not be required.
  • If you haven't supplied any evidence yet, a medical report from an appropriate qualified medical practitioner will be required.
Childbirth or pregnancy complications that result in hospitalisation Medical certificate/hospital report/report from qualified medical practitioner. These should be signed whilst the symptoms were still apparent to the medical practitioner.
Diagnosed psychological illness

Report from a psychiatrist, psychologist, or medical practitioner

  • If you've already supplied this to the AccessAbility Centre or your department, further evidence will not be required.
  • If you haven't supplied any evidence yet, a medical report from an appropriate qualified medical practitioner will be required.
Legal proceedings requiring attendance at court as a witness or jury service Documentary evidence from the court or a solicitor.
Severe adverse personal/family difficulties Report from Student Counselling Service, Student Welfare Service or another qualified professional.
Being the victim of a serious crime Crime report and number, or evidence from alternative reporting routes as appropriate. Letter from medical professional/counsellor.
Significant and immediate change in working conditions (distance learning and part-time students only) Evidence from employer detailing the change in working conditions and timescale of advance notice given to employee (student). Call up papers for military deployment.

Evidence that will not be accepted:

  • Evidence not clearly linked to you or your close family member in question
  • Hospital or other medical appointment letters, unless accompanied by a medical report
  • Self-certification of illness from either you or close relatives, without supporting medical documentation
  • Medical evidence from alternative/homeopathic practitioners
  • Statements from friends, relatives or other associates stating whether a student has been a victim of crime
  • Anecdotal evidence without supporting documentary confirmation
  • Photographs or media extracts relating to events which are not accompanied by clear evidence of their relevance to the you or the assessment in question
  • Statements of support from other students unless accompanied by other documentation outlined in the list of acceptable evidence
  • Any evidence that is not clearly contemporaneous with the learning and teaching activities or assessment in question

Supplying evidence

The evidence you submit needs to explain what the circumstance is, exactly how it affected you in relation to your assessment and precisely when (i.e. identifying which assessments were affected). The evidence needs to give precise details about how your circumstance is affecting your performance. The evidence you give needs to be written in English and produced by an appropriate third party. If it’s originally in another language, it’s your responsibility to ensure a translation is supplied.

If you experience a marked deterioration in a pre-existing condition, and you have already handed in evidence to your department or the AccessAbility Centre to confirm it, it will not be necessary to provide additional supporting evidence. In all other cases evidence will be required.

If your programme uses multiple small-scale assessments that provide a mark and grade, you may self-certify a limited number of times if you have a short term minor illness (less than five calendar days). Repeated cases of self-certification could result in a request for evidence.