Cloud Computing Education in the UK: Two Professors’ Perspectives

Posted by ap507 at Aug 29, 2017 11:12 AM |
As part of Clutch’s ongoing research on cloud computing education at universities and colleges, Clutch interviewed two cloud computing experts who teach at universities in the UK - including Dr Thomas Erlebach from our Department of Informatics

Think: Leicester does not necessarily reflect the views of the University of Leicester - it expresses the independent views and opinions of the academic who has authored the piece. If you do not agree with the opinions expressed, and you are a doctoral student/academic at the University of Leicester, you may write a counter opinion for Think: Leicester and send to ap507@le.ac.uk

'In May, Clutch released a report analyzing cloud computing education at universities and colleges in the United States. Through interviews with experienced professors and lecturers, we found that cloud computing lags in the US for a number of reasons, including cost of courses, lack of experienced staff, and the rapid pace of innovation in the industry.

'What is the situation with cloud computing education like around the world, though?

In Clutch's research for its first cloud computing education report, online searches revealed a larger number of structured options available for studying cloud computing in the United Kingdom, as opposed to in the US.

'Clutch interviewed two professors from universities in the UK to explore this trend and gain a greater international perspective. Dr. Thomas Erlebach of the University of Leicester and Dr. Raj Ranjan of Newcastle University share their experiences teaching cloud computing and explain how cloud computing education differs in the UK.

'Dr. Erlebach and Dr. Ranjan discuss two factors that may contribute to a greater presence of cloud computing education in the UK, as opposed to in the US:

  • More funding for research
  • More flexibility among graduate programs
  • Share this page:

    Disclaimer

    Think: Leicester does not necessarily reflect the views of the University of Leicester - it expresses the independent views and opinions of the academic who has authored the piece. If you do not agree with the opinions expressed, and you are a doctoral student/academic at the University of Leicester, you may write a counter opinion for Think: Leicester and send to ap507@le.ac.uk