Game Theory: How to put oneself in someone else's shoes

Posted by ap507 at Jun 02, 2015 01:25 PM |
Any marketing or political campaign, a conflict between countries, tension in the workplace, or a couples quarrel can be described as a game for which game theory provides insights, according to Professor Eyal Winter
Game Theory: How to put oneself in someone else's shoes

Source: The Independent; the late John Nash

Read the full article on The Independent's website here.

Think: Leicester does not necessarily reflect the views of the University of Leicester - it expresses the independent views and opinions of the academic who has authored the piece. If you do not agree with the opinions expressed, and you are a doctoral student/academic at the University of Leicester, you may write a counter opinion for Think: Leicester and send to ap507@le.ac.uk

Professor Eyal Winter from the Department of Economics has written an article for The Independent where he discusses meeting the late John Nash in 1995, shortly after he won the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences, and subsequent meetings where they talked to one another about game theory, politics and life.

He discusses how John Nash was one of the founders of game theory, a field of research that many also refer to as the theory of interactive decision-making. Any marketing or political campaign, a conflict between countries, tension in the workplace, or a couples quarrel can be described as a game for which game theory provides insights.

He suggests that Nash's brief academic career, before his illness with schizophrenia, led to two research papers published in 1950. These two publications arguably remain the most important and most influential publications in the field.

The full article can be read by clicking the above link on The Independent's website.

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Think: Leicester does not necessarily reflect the views of the University of Leicester - it expresses the independent views and opinions of the academic who has authored the piece. If you do not agree with the opinions expressed, and you are a doctoral student/academic at the University of Leicester, you may write a counter opinion for Think: Leicester and send to ap507@le.ac.uk