2013

Social Worlds in 100 objects – The Football

Posted by uatemp13 at Mar 31, 2015 11:20 AM |

The football: a ‘simple’ game?

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Non-Stop for Mandela

Non-Stop for Mandela

Posted by sb661 at Dec 06, 2013 09:35 AM |

Dr Gavin Brown discusses on the history of the Non-Stop Picket

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Miss Doctor Who?

Miss Doctor Who?

Posted by sb661 at Nov 22, 2013 10:10 AM |

James Chapman, Professor of Film Studies discusses whether there will ever be a female 'Doctor Who'

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The Legacy of Norbert Elias, Leicester and Beyond

Posted by uatemp13 at Oct 28, 2013 12:00 AM |

As part of the University’s ‘Legacy of Leicester’ project, Professor Jason Hughes from the Department of Sociology looks back over the career of the ‘father of ‘figurational sociology’ Norbert Elias.

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How can we stop children being murdered?

Posted by uatemp13 at Oct 18, 2013 12:00 PM |

According to the United Nations Children’s Fund, the lot of Britain’s children has improved. Ranked 16th out of 29 developed countries surveyed, action on child obesity, smoking and alcohol abuse has been successful. However, as shown by the case of four-year-old Hamzah Khan who was starved to death by his substance-abusing mother, there is a dark underbelly to British society. Such episodes are not new.

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I have a dream

Posted by uatemp13 at Aug 28, 2013 12:05 AM |

Given the context in which it was delivered, the surprise is not that Martin Luther King’s “I Have a Dream” speech remains so well known, but that it continues to be remembered at all. It was delivered at the March on Washington on 28 August 1963, as one man’s contribution to a day-long protest that was designed and organised by veteran civil rights campaigners A. Philip Randolph and Bayard Rustin to bring constitutional freedoms and greater job prospects to African Americans. Although King’s oratory is now routinely cited as both a seminal moment in the civil rights struggle and an unparalleled spell of oratorical genius, at the time there were fundamental issues that threatened not only the way in which it was received by its intended audience, but also its very delivery.

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