University of Leicester geneticists to present at Who Do You Think You Are? Live

Posted by es328 at Apr 03, 2017 11:02 AM |
Dr Turi King and Professor Mark Jobling will discuss their research on the discovery of Richard III and DNA landscapes of Britain and Western Europe on 6 and 7 April
Issued by the University of Leicester Press Office on 3 April 2017
  • Dr Turi King will discuss the discovery of Richard III between 13:15 and 14:15 on Thursday 6 April.

  • Professor Mark Jobling will discuss DNA and genealogical research between 13:15 and 14:15 on Friday 7 April.
  • Who Do You Think You Are? Live is the largest family history show in the world and will run between 6 – 8 April at the NEC Birmingham.

Geneticists from the University of Leicester will discuss the discovery of Richard III and genealogical research in presentations at Who Do You Think You Are? Live at the NEC Birmingham on Thursday 6 April and Friday 7 April.

Dr Turi King and Professor Mark Jobling will give talks at the event, based on the popular BBC One programme, which is the world’s largest family history show.

Dr King will tell the story of the genetic, genealogical and archaeological research which led to the discovery and identification of the remains of King Richard III.

Her lecture will outline the underlying archaeological work leading up to the discovery of the skeletal remains, the DNA analysis and genealogical research carried out in parallel to help identify the skeleton, and the statistical analysis of the evidence.

Dr King said: “With many years of working in the field of genetic genealogy, working with surnames experts and family historians, I really enjoy speaking at ‘Who Do You Think You Are? Live’ every year and meeting people who are interested in using DNA to augment their genealogical research.

“I will be telling the story of how I led the team which used genealogical and surnames research alongside mitochondrial DNA and Y chromosome analysis as part of the identification of King Richard III.”

The talk will take place between 13:15 and 14:15 on Thursday 6 April.

Professor Jobling will discuss how the paternally-inherited Y chromosome and maternally-inherited mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have been widely used in population genetic studies and also in genealogical research.

His talk will include a comparison of Europe-wide patterns of Y and mtDNA diversity, and what this tells us about the behaviours of the different sexes in past demographic transitions.

Professor Jobling said: “This is a very large-scale annual event that testifies to the widespread fascination about family history and genealogy.

“An increasing number of people are turning to DNA analysis to help them, and developing an interest in the arcane business of historical population genetics along the way. I will talk about our work indicating how the Bronze Age was a particularly significant period in shaping the genetic landscape of Europe.”

Professor Jobling’s talk will run between 13:15 and 14:15 on Friday 7 April.

More information about Who Do You Think You Are? Live is available here: http://www.whodoyouthinkyouarelive.com/

 

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