Vascular surgery patients needed for kidney damage study

Posted by ap507 at Jun 08, 2016 11:04 AM |
Leicestershire people set to undergo keyhole vascular surgery are being recruited for a new study to help find ways to prevent kidney damage which can sometimes occur afterwards

Issued by the Leicester Diabetes Centre on 8 June

Leicestershire people set to undergo keyhole vascular surgery are being recruited for a new study to help find ways to prevent kidney damage which can sometimes occur afterwards.

Researchers are hoping patients who are due to have an operation on the main aorta artery that leads away from the heart will sign up to the trial.

They want to test how effective administering a blood salt called bicarbonate before surgery can be in preventing kidney problems, post-surgery.

The minimally invasive procedure, called endovascular aneurysm repair, is otherwise known as keyhole surgery.

Although largely effective, the operation can sometimes impact on the function of the person’s kidneys.

The aim of the study – entitled ‘Hydration and bicarbonate to prevent acute renal injury after endovascular aneurysm repair’ or ‘HYDRA-P’ – is to explore why the kidneys can sometimes be affected and how to stop it.

Mr Athanasios Saratzis, an NIHR Academic Clinical Lecturer in Surgery from the NIHR Leicester Cardiovascular Biomedical Research Unit (BRU), said: “It is well established that if someone’s kidney function deteriorates after surgery, other even more serious complications can arise.

“It is therefore essential to prevent kidney deterioration. Administering a blood salt called bicarbonate before surgery has previously been shown to help prevent kidney problems in similar forms of surgery and we want to investigate this further.

“Participating in the trial is completely voluntary, but taking part would be hugely beneficial as the information gathered will help us to improve the overall quality of care that we will provide for the future patients.”

Those who sign up will have their kidney function measured before the surgery using a routine blood test.

They will then be randomly allocated to one of two study groups. Both groups will receive fluids through a vein.

Half the patients will be given the bicarbonate ingredient prior to the operation.

Blood tests will then be taken after the surgery and urine passing will also be monitored and recorded along with the function of the patient’s vital organs.

It is hoped if the findings are positive the study will be opened up onto a national scale so researchers can find a definitive answer on how to prevent kidney failure in patients who undergo keyhole operations for aneurysms.

The study is being sponsored by the University of Leicester and has been funded as part of an Academy for Medical Sciences (AMS) Starter Grant.

The BRU has helped with study design, patient and public involvement and supported the overall overview of the trial.

BRUs are focused on translational clinical research, taking new ideas from the laboratory bench to the patient’s bedside to improve health.

The Leicester Cardiovascular BRU is one of 20 units around England funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), a strategic research funding body within the NHS.

It is a partnership between the University of Leicester and University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Notes to editors

  • Fiona.bailey@ojpr.co.uk
  • Website: http://www.le.ac.uk/bru  Twitter: @LeicesterBRU
  • The Leicester Cardiovascular Biomedical Research Unit (BRU) at Glenfield Hospital aims to improve the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. The unit provides state-of-the-art facilities and equipment to assist researchers in their complex projects. It is one of 20 BRUs in England funded by the NIHR. It is a partnership between the University of Leicester and University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust. The Unit's director is Professor Sir Nilesh Samani and the manager is Dr Martin Batty.

   ·   The National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) is funded by the

Department of Health to improve the health and wealth of the nation through research. The NIHR is the research arm of the NHS. Since its establishment in April 2006, the NIHR has transformed research in the NHS. It has increased the volume of applied health research for the benefit of patients and the public, driven faster translation of basic science discoveries into tangible benefits for patients and the economy, and developed and supported the people who conduct and contribute to applied health research. The NIHR plays a key role in the Government’s strategy for economic growth, attracting investment by the life-sciences industries through its world-class infrastructure for health research. Together, the NIHR people, programmes, centres of excellence and systems represent the most integrated health research system in the world. For further information, visit http://www.nihr.ac.uk.

 

 

Share this page: