Preconceptions predict coping and health outcomes

Posted by ap507 at Jul 08, 2016 10:14 AM |
University of Leicester researchers involved in study into chronic kidney disease

Issued by University of Leicester Press Office on 8 July 2016

Research involving the University of Leicester has shown people who have chronic kidney disease (CKD) form pre-conceived beliefs about their illness which can impact their health.

Existing studies looking at CKD suggest that negative thoughts and feelings can contribute to the condition getting worse.

The study was funded by a research grant from Kidney Research UK. It was supported by the NIHR Leicester-Loughborough Diet, Lifestyle and Physical Activity BRU and carried out by the Leicester Kidney Exercise Team in collaboration with King’s College London.

Miss Amy Clarke, a researcher in health and behavioural psychology at the University of Leicester Department of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation who carried out the narrative review, said: “The studies we looked at suggested that patients, even in the earlier stages of the disease, experience a number of negative illness perceptions which influence the way they cope with their condition.”

Miss Clarke, who is also a faculty member of the NIHR Leicester-Loughborough Diet, Lifestyle and Physical Activity BRU, added: “The evidence suggests that understanding how patients feel about their condition should definitely not be underestimated and where possible we think working with patients to help them approach their illness more positively will have a huge impact on health outcomes.”

More research is now required to determine more about how patients’ beliefs may impact illness.

Kidney disease is a growing epidemic. There are around 3 million people in the UK who have CKD, but many of these people are not aware they have the condition.

This is because there are little or no symptoms until the disease is quite advanced.

The Leicester Kidney Exercise Team is a multidisciplinary research group based at Leicester General Hospital. They are dedicated to enhancing the health, wellbeing and quality of life of people with kidney disease through appropriate physical activity and exercise.

BRUs are focused on translational clinical research, taking new ideas from the laboratory bench to the patient’s bedside to improve health.

The Leicester-Loughborough BRU is a national centre of excellence in diet, lifestyle and physical activity. It harnesses the power of experimental science to explore and develop ways to help prevent and treat chronic disease.

Notes to editors:

  • For further details, to arrange an interview or more photographs, email oliver.jelley@ojpr.co.uk
  • The National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) is funded by the Department of Health to improve the health and wealth of the nation through research. The NIHR is the research arm of the NHS. Since its establishment in April 2006, the NIHR has transformed research in the NHS. It has increased the volume of applied health research for the benefit of patients and the public, driven faster translation of basic science discoveries into tangible benefits for patients and the economy, and developed and supported the people who conduct and contribute to applied health research. The NIHR plays a key role in the Government’s strategy for economic growth, attracting investment by the life-sciences industries through its world-class infrastructure for health research. Together, the NIHR people, programmes, centres of excellence and systems represent the most integrated health research system in the world. For further information, visit the NIHR website www.nihr.ac.uk
  • http://www.ll.dlpa.bru.nihr.ac.uk
  • The NIHR Leicester-Loughborough Diet, Lifestyle and Physical Activity Biomedical Research Unit (BRU) is funded by the NIHR. By harnessing the power of experimental science we will explore and develop innovative lifestyle interventions to help prevent and treat chronic disease for the benefit of all. The BRUs undertake translational clinical research in priority areas of high disease burden and clinical need.
  • The Leicester Kidney Exercise Team is a multidisciplinary research group based at Leicester General Hospital which comprises health professionals from the University of Leicester, University Hospitals of Leicester and Loughborough University. They are dedicated to enhancing the health, wellbeing and quality of life of people with kidney disease through appropriate physical activity and exercise.

 

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