Standing up helps prevent Type 2 diabetes

Posted by ap507 at Dec 16, 2015 11:55 AM |
University of Leicester researchers reveal how light movement can reduce blood sugar and insulin levels

Issued by University of Leicester Press Office on 16 December 2015

Women who have an inactive daily routine and are at high risk of Type 2 diabetes can help prevent the condition by regularly standing up or walking for five minutes at a time, a new study has found.

Currently, those at risk of the condition are advised to engage in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) for at least 150 minutes per week. But research published in Diabetes Care, The journal of the American Diabetes Association, suggests that breaking up prolonged periods of sitting regularly with five minutes bouts of light movement every 30 minutes significantly reduces blood sugar and insulin levels.

The findings of the study carried out at the Leicester Diabetes Centre demonstrate the importance of incorporating breaks in prolonged sitting into otherwise sedentary lifestyles.

It was led by University of Leicester researchers working for the NIHR Leicester-Loughborough Diet, Lifestyle and Physical Activity Biomedical Research Unit (BRU).

The research set out to determine whether breaking up periods of sitting with regular standing or short walks improved sugar levels across the course of the day and to see whether these observations persisted into the next day in women at high risk of Type 2 diabetes.

The study involved 22 overweight/obese individuals who were randomly assigned to the following conditions; prolonged, continuous sitting (7.5 hours) or prolonged sitting broken up with either standing or walking at a self-perceived light-intensity (for five minutes every 30 minutes). Standardised breakfast and lunch meals were provided. The following day, all participants returned to undergo the sitting protocol (7.5 hours).

The researchers observed that interrupting periods of prolonged sitting with five minutes of standing every 30 minutes elicited similar changes to sugar and insulin levels following breakfast and lunch as breaking up sitting with identical periods of self-perceived light-intensity walking. Compared with uninterrupted sitting, standing reduced the rise in sugar levels by 34 per cent (compared with a 28 per cent reduction for walking) and the rise in insulin concentrations by 20 per cent (37 per cent for walking) on the day of the intervention. Moreover, the observations for sugar (standing and walking) and insulin (walking only) persisted into the next day.

Lead researcher Dr Joseph Henson concluded: “Breaking up prolonged sitting with five minute bouts of standing or walking at a self-perceived light intensity significantly reduced sugar and insulin responses in women at high risk of Type 2 diabetes.

“This simple, behavioural approach could inform future public health interventions aimed at improving the metabolic profile of women at a high risk of Type 2 diabetes. As standing and walking are behaviourally more common than MVPA these findings may provide appealing interventional targets in the promotion of metabolic health.”

The Leicester Diabetes Centre is an international centre of excellence in diabetes research, education and innovation led by Professor Melanie Davies and Professor Kamlesh Khunti. Hosted at Leicester General Hospital, the centre is a partnership between the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust and the University of Leicester.

BRUs are focused on translational clinical research, taking new ideas from the laboratory bench to the patient’s bedside to improve health. The Leicester and the Leicester-Loughborough BRU is a national centre of excellence in diet, lifestyle and physical activity. It harnesses the power of experimental science to explore and develop ways to help prevent and treat chronic disease.

The study ‘Breaking Up Prolonged Sitting With Standing or Walking Attenuates the Postprandial Metabolic Response in Postmenopausal Women: A Randomized Acute Study’ is available at: http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/early/2015/11/29/dc15-1240.full.pdf+html.

ENDS

Notes to editors:

  • Patient interviews can be arranged. For further details, to arrange an interview or more photographs, email oliver.jelley@ojpr.co.uk
  • For a copy of the paper please see: http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/early/2015/11/29/dc15-1240.full.pdf+html
  • The Leicester-Loughborough Diet, Lifestyle and Physical Activity Biomedical Research Unit (BRU) is funded by the NIHR. By harnessing the power of experimental science we will explore and develop innovative lifestyle interventions to help prevent and treat chronic disease for the benefit of all. The BRUs undertake translational clinical research in priority areas of high disease burden and clinical need. For further information, visit http://www.ll.dlpa.bru.nihr.ac.uk.
  • The National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) is funded by the Department of Health to improve the health and wealth of the nation through research. Since its establishment in April 2006, the NIHR has transformed research in the NHS. It has increased the volume of applied health research for the benefit of patients and the public, driven faster translation of basic science discoveries into tangible benefits for patients and the economy, and developed and supported the people who conduct and contribute to applied health research. The NIHR plays a key role in the Government’s strategy for economic growth, attracting investment by the life-sciences industries through its world-class infrastructure for health research. Together, the NIHR people, programmes, centres of excellence and systems represent the most integrated health research system in the world. For further information, visit http://www.nihr.ac.uk.
  • The Leicester Diabetes Centre is an international centre of excellence in diabetes research, education and innovation and is led by Professor Melanie Davies and Professor Kamlesh Khunti. Hosted at Leicester General Hospital, the Leicester Diabetes Centre is a partnership between the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust and the University of Leicester, working with the city and county Clinical Commissioning Groups. It is a leading applied health research unit committed to improving the lives and care of people with diabetes and other long-term conditions.
  • For more information about the Leicester Diabetes Centre, visit http://www.leicesterdiabetescentre.org.uk.

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