Important people in the department.

Emailing lecturers or seeing them briefly to ask for an appointment is usually the best way to get urgent problems dealt with quickly. Stopping a lecturer in the corridor, walking into their office or the staff room unannounced to talk about the problem immediately is not as easy as it can be at school or in a College of Further Education. Different people in the department can help in different ways.

Personal Tutor

This person is usually one of the academic staff.  You can email them, speak to them directly, write to them or phone them.  I suggest you email them as soon as you know who they are and your University account is working.  If you struggle to contact people you do not know, get someone you do know and trust to help you.  The AAC can help you to do this too.  Your personal tutor is there to help with course related problems and can liaise with other staff on your behalf.  They can help with personal and general life problems; if they cannot help with something they will help you find a more suitable person.

How to contact:

  1. Email in advance to see if they are free
  2. Visit them during their office hour (lists available on blackboard under XX000)
  3. Visit them in their office out of hours if the problem is urgent, there is no guarantee that they will be in their office however.

AccessAbility Tutor / Departmental Disability Officer 

Each department has a member of staff who is responsible for all the disabled students in the department.  They try to find out how each student’s disability affects their access to their education. It is probably a good idea to email them information about the support you have had at school and the exam arrangements you have had in the past. The AAC can do this for you if you prefer.  This person can help you with the forms you have to fill in, help you to understand the regulations and help you if you are struggling with deadlines.  They can pass on information to other staff about problems you are having (if any) and might be able help you to explain your difficulties to others.

Usually during your induction lecture they will make themselves known or you can ask the AAC for their contact details.

How to contact:

  1. Email them to arrange an appointment
  2. Visit them in their office (some AAC tutors are busier than others so you may have to wait or come back at a later point, so it is better to arrange an appointment)
  3. You may be able to have a regular meeting with them to make sure that you are getting all the support you need.


Module Convenor

This person is usually a lecturer and is in charge of a unit/module that you are studying.  They can explain what you are expected to do, and help if you are struggling to understand.  Sometimes different lecturers are responsible for different parts of a module.  The advice below is relevant to them too.

How to contact:

  1. Email in advance to ask if you can see them about a problem
  2. Visit them during their office hour (lists available on blackboard under XX000)
  3. Visit them in their office out of hours if the problem is urgent; there is no guarantee that they will be there and be free to spend a lot of time with you.  


Administration staff

These staff members are often in the general office for your department and can be very helpful in giving you information about timetable changes, filling in paper work e.g. front cover sheets for coursework or late submission medical evidence forms, and how to contact academic staff.

  1. Visit them in their office (no need to make an appointment)
  2. Email them to explain your problem
Contact Us

+44 (0)116 252 5002

accessable@le.ac.uk

or visit us on the ground floor of the Library

The AccessAbility Centre is open 9.00am to 5.00pm, Monday to Friday, during both terms and vacations. Contact us if you would like to speak with someone outside of these hours.

Accessibility

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The University of Leicester is committed to equal access to our facilities. DisabledGo has a detailed accessibility guide for the David Wilson Library.