Independent Research and Library Study exercises

 

 

These exercises mean you have to go away and find out about a particular topic.  They make you practice using the library and online academic search engines for finding useful books and journal articles, which is a skill in itself!

Going to the library is useful because if the recommended book is not available, or is not ‘an easy read’, then you can look on the shelves in the same topic area to find other books with the same information about the same theories.

The journal collection in the library is useful too.  The journals have to stay in the library so it is more likely you will have to find the recommended articles and take a photocopy.  

A good way to develop your understanding independently is: 

(a) look at ‘introduction to’ type books, these usually explain the new ideas clearly.  Use the index to find paragraphs or part chapters on the information you need and read only the bits you need to read to understand, you DO NOT ALWAYS need to READ THE WHOLE THING.  Then

(b) make notes / spider diagrams / mind maps / other sorts of diagrams that suit your learning style.  Finally

(c) read more widely adding to your notes from different books and journal articles. 

It is likely that you will not easily understand everything you read.  If you are\struggling, ask for help.  You can do this by emailing another student, a subject Buddy, the help desk, your Study Adviser, or the Module Convenor, to start the process of getting help.  Remember, most students help each other when they get stuck.  If they are still stuck, they ask teaching staff.  This is not cheating.

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