'Re-thinking the sex trafficking debate: politics, geography and morality'

Speaker Professor Belinda Carpenter from the Queensland University of Technology
Type Arts & Entertainment
Starts at Dec 03, 2014 02:00 PM
Ends at Dec 03, 2014 03:30 PM
Venue Department of Criminology (154 Upper New Walk)
Open To Public

The Socio-Legal Group in the School of Law, in conjunction with the Gender and Justice Research Group in the Department of Criminology, are pleased to announce a seminar to be delivered by Prof Belinda Carpenter from the Queensland University of Technology entitled: ‘Re-thinking the sex trafficking debate: politics, geography and morality’.

The Seminar will take place on on Wednesday 3rd December from 14.00-15.30 at the Department of Criminology

About the Seminar

Current perceptions of trafficking see it as a modern form of slavery with people transported from one location to another and forced to work against their will. In the 21st century its existence is seen as a striking indictment on the failure of law enforcement, legislators and policy makers to protect vulnerable populations.

While trafficking occurs in a range of industries, it is only in sex trafficking that a relationship is identified between the trafficked and non-trafficked elements of the industry.

At its heart is a concern about prostitution as a distinct and unique form of harm where women are at risk of victimisation, commodification and exploitation, where intimate relationships are debased and commercialised and where money takes the place of love, intimacy and consent.

The gendered harm of prostitution is magnified via the expectation that all migration to sell sex and the various forms of debt bondage that are often required to facilitate it, are always and only the result of sex trafficking. Here traditional sexual scripts of masculinity and femininity inform the idea that women are more vulnerable than men when leaving home to make money.

This presentation explores these ideas which underpin both our domestic and international legislative and policy responses.

No booking required, to attend the seminar, please come to the Department of Criminology (154 Upper New Walk) for 14.00 on Wednesday 3 December.