Associate Law Professor elected as an Academic Fellow of the Honourable Society of the Inner Temple

Posted by crm28 at Nov 20, 2017 03:42 PM |
Martin George, Associate Professor of Property Law, has been recognised for his legal teaching by the Bar of England and Wales. The fellowship will build stronger ties between barristers and Leicester Law School.

The Inner Temple has an essential role in the modern legal profession, particularly in the education and training of future barristers. Each year, the Inner Temple invites applications from legal academics to become one of four new Academic Fellows.

‘The Academic Fellowship Scheme aims to recognise the outstanding contribution of legal teaching and research of early to mid-career academics to the Bar of England and Wales. It also aims to support their research and to build stronger ties between barristers and legal academia. Since its foundation, a core function of the Inner Temple has been legal education. Today, many of our leading legal academics are members of the Inn. We are delighted to welcome these ‘academics to watch’ to the Inner Temple community and look forward to working with them in coming years. They will be joining some of the top senior barristers, judges and international leaders today.’

The Inner Temple is one of the four Inns of Court of England & Wales. It was created by the Knights Templar in the 12th Century, and received its Royal Charter in 1608.

Martin George will spend three years as an Academic Fellow, during which he will deliver lectures at the Inner Temple in London. Martin will also host events at the University of Leicester for our law students, sponsored and supported by the Inner Temple. A primary aim of Martin’s Fellowship is to increase to the number of high-quality applications from Leicester Law School students to all parts of Bar, and maximise their chances of pursuing a career as a barrister.

Professor Peter Jaffey, Acting Head of Leicester Law School, says ‘This appointment to an academic fellowship at Inner Temple is an important mark of recognition for Martin’s work, and a wonderful opportunity for him to develop his research and teaching through engagement with barristers and judges, and to develop links between Leicester Law School and the Bar.’

Martin George's research and teaching interests lie in land law, the conflict of laws and legal education. He currently teaches Land Law on the LLB course and Principles of the Common Law on the LLM course.

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