Figures from University feature on King Richard III Pall

Posted by ap507 at Mar 30, 2015 11:45 AM |
Embroidered cloth covered coffin now on display at Leicester Cathedral
Figures from University feature on King Richard III Pall

Credit: Mike Sewell/Leicester Cathedral Quarter Partnership Board (LCQPB)

Figures from the University of Leicester feature on the pall that covered the coffin of King Richard III.

The embroidered funeral pall was revealed at a reception service for the monarch at Leicester Cathedral on 22 March.

Created by artist Jacquie Binns, the black pall is beautifully  decorated with an intriguing mix of images. Alongside a knight in armour and King Richard’s queen in heraldic robes are the faces of a number of individuals connected to the dig.

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From L to R: Former Vice-Chancellor Professor Sir Robert Burgess, Dr Richard Buckley and Dr Jo Appleby
Depicted on the pall are six seraphim, then in groups of three the following: medieval bishop, friar, priest; a medieval shrouded, lady and knight; Philippa Langley, John Ashdown-Hill and Phil Stone; and Sir Peter Soulsby, the very Revd David Monteith, the Rt Revd Tim Stevens.

The University trio depicted on the pall are former Vice-Chancellor Professor Sir Robert Burgess, Richard Buckley and Jo Appleby.

The Pall was draped over the lead-lined oak coffin by the descendants of four peers who fought both for and against King Richard at the Battle of Bosworth in August 1485.

A portable exhibit of the embroidered pall will form part of the permanent exhibition and interpretation programme at Leicester Cathedral. This has been funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund, the Drapers Trust and the All Churches Trust.Pall4

Vanessa Harbar, head of the Heritage Lottery Fund East Midlands said, “This coffin pall represents the coming together of past and present.  It helps us to reflect on a tumultuous period in our history and what it means for our own times. Helped by Lottery funding, the pall and the permanent exhibition will ensure that visitors to the Cathedral will be able to learn about this extraordinary story and experience parts of the re-internment service for themselves. It’s just one of many ways that Leicester has used its heritage to regenerate the city in recent years.”