Tree map helps identify diseases in UK trees

Posted by ap507 at Jul 22, 2014 11:30 AM |
Project with Bluesky to investigate the use of airborne mapping systems to identify diseases in trees

University researchers are working with Bluesky, creator of the first ever National Tree Map, to investigate the use of airborne mapping systems to identify diseases in trees.

The health of UK forestry has been in the news for many years with Sudden Oak Death, Dutch Elm and more recently Ash Die Back and Red Band Needle Drop all generating headlines. Funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) and supported by Forest Research, the study will investigate the use of aerial photography, thermal imaging and airborne laser mapping systems to improve the identification of diseases, determine the accuracy of identification and inform responses to disease outbreaks.

The research project will be led by Professor Heiko Balzter (pictured) from the Department of Geography, who has over 17 years’ experience in remote sensing and ecological modelling. Professor Balzter, holder of the Royal Society Wolfson Research Merit Award, is Director of the Centre for Landscape and Climate research at the University.

It is hoped that the impact of this research will help protect the British landscape. It is anticipated it will also allow for the more effective containment of infections preventing the spread of disease between forested areas.