Queen's Anniversary Prize for Discovery of Richard III

Posted by ap507 at Nov 22, 2013 10:20 AM |
University recognised for long record of exceptional research, commercial archaeology and public engagement
Queen's Anniversary Prize for Discovery of Richard III

© Royal Anniversary Trust

We have received Royal recognition for the excellence of our work – this time for the discovery of Richard III with the award of the Queen’s Anniversary Prize for Higher and Further Education (link contains quote from Vice-Chancellor Professor Sir Robert Burgess).

The announcement was made by the Royal Anniversary Trust by kind permission of Her Majesty The Queen, at a reception at St James’s Palace yesterday evening.

The University is recognised for ‘Inter-connected research and expertise in history, heritage and archaeology, highlighted by the discovery of Richard III.’

The University of Leicester team that discovered the remains of Richard III beneath a car park are honoured for their long record of exceptional research, commercial archaeology and public engagement.

This is the third time in two decades the University of Leicester has won the Queen’s Anniversary Prize - the previous Awards to the University were for work in the Department of Physics and Astronomy and for work in Genetics.

The prestigious biennial awards are part of the UK’s national Honours system and are the highest form of national recognition open to a UK academic or vocational institution. A prize-winner must be able to demonstrate outstanding work at world-class level in order to receive a Queen's Anniversary Prize for Higher and Further Education.

  • Press Release
  • The Dig for Richard III was led by the University of Leicester, working with Leicester City Council and in association with the Richard III Society. The originator of the Search project was Philippa Langley of the Richard III Society.

 

Watch project manager Richard Buckley from University of Leicester Archaeological Services (ULAS) discuss the 'Greyfriars Project' below:

Watch Dr Turi King from the University of Leicester's Department of Genetics and Dr Jo Appleby from the University's School of Archaeology and Ancient History discuss scientific processes and techniques here:

 

Listen to a selection of podcasts that tell the story during the Search for Richard III below: