Life in Roman fortresses: how did the other half live, asks University of Leicester archaeologist

Posted by uatemp13 at Jun 24, 2013 02:05 PM |
University of Leicester academic looks at lives of ordinary people in Roman fortresses in new book
Life in Roman fortresses: how did the other half live, asks University of Leicester archaeologist

People and Spaces in Roman Military Bases book cover

Dr. Penelope Allison, Reader in Archaeology and Ancient History at the University of Leicester's School of Archaeology and Ancient History, is publishing a new book on lives of women and non-fighting Romans in Roman imperial military bases.

‘When we think of Romans, we tend to conjure images of formidable legions, soaring amphitheatres, mad emperors and Pontius Pilate: but how did everyday people, such as women and those who accompanied the soldiers while they kept the empire in check, live their lives behind high walls and watchtowers?’

To answer that question, Dr. Allison analyses space and the distribution of artefacts in excavated German forts to paint a picture of what the lives of women and non-combatants was actually like, publishing the results in her new book 'People and Spaces in Roman Military Bases'.

‘She looks at these lives in minute detail, including the place of  these ‘camp followers’ in these military communities they moved around with the imperial machine. In doing so, Allison shows us the real lives and concerns of the people behind the emperors and legionaries.