Small Towns Project Images Catalogue

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aldeborough1_tn.gif This was painted by JMW Turner (1775-1851), circa 1830. (Body colour on blue paper; approximately 172 by 254mm; from a private collection). It is one of a series of views he produced of the east coast of England, which include paintings of Dunwich, Orford, and Lowestoft - other Suffolk small towns.
aldeborough2_tn.gif A depiction of Aldeborough from the early nineteenth century, artist unknown. Aldeborough was a small seaside town. In the seventeenth century Dutch wars, sea erosion and the decline of ship-building depressed the town, although it did benefit later from becoming a fashionable bathing place.
beccles_tn.gif Beccles church by Henry Davy (1793-1865). He was an artist, etcher, and publisher based at Southwold and Ipswich in Suffolk, who published nearly two hundred views of churches, houses, monuments, and antiquities. Two important publications were Antiquities of Suffolk 1823-7, and Views of the Seats of Noblemen and Gentlemen in Suffolk, 1823.
bungay_tn.gif Bungay spa. John King, a local apothecary, constructed a bath house on a spring at his land at Earsham, near Bungay, raising the necessary funds by subscription. This is a drawing from J King's Essay on Cold Bathing of 1737.
dunwich1_tn.gif By Turner, circa 1830. (Body colour on blue paper; approximately 172 by 254mm; private collection). This is one of a series that Turner painted of the east coast
dunwich2_tn.gif Map of Dunwich, from the mid-eighteenth century. Dunwich was a small coastal town which suffered greatly from sea erosion, and this map shows stretches of the coastline which have been washed away since. Many houses were lost to the sea in a bad storm in 1328, and this onslaught continued into our period of interest, when St Peter's Church and St Francis' Chapel collapsed into the sea in the early eighteenth century
hadleigh_tn.gif By Turner, circa 1830. (Body colour on blue paper; approximately 172 by 254mm; private collection). This is one of a series that Turner painted of the east coast
lowestoft1_tn.gif Lowestoft lighthouse by Turner, circa 1830 (water colour and body colour on blue paper; approximately 120 by 190mm; vignette; from the Pantzer Collection).
lowestoft2_tn.gif Lowestoft swing bridge, from a print of circa 1855. When the bridge opened in June 1830 a local newspaper said, "This beautiful structure opens in the middle to admit ships, and although of vast weight, each half weighing not less than 125 tons, is moved by the aid of the simplest machinery with so little exertion that a boy can open it with the greatest of ease."
lowestoft3_tn.gif Victorians parading on the pier at Lowestoft. Lowestoft began to develop as a popular resort from the later eighteenth century. In 1784 the Universal British Directory noted that, "here are good bathing machines, and this place is much resorted to in the bathing season by the nobility and gentry."
newmarketrace_tn.gif Racing at Newmarket by James Ross, circa 1740 (oil on canvas; 635 by 915mm; private collection). King Charles II was the first man to establish racing stables at Newmarket, in the 1660s (Peter May, The Changing Face of Newmarket, 1984). Probably as a result of such royal influence racing has always been an important part of Newmarket's economy, and many of the paintings of Newmarket from the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries reflect this.
newmarket_tn.gif View from near Warren Hill training ground, Newmarket, probably by Tillemans, circa 1720-30. Newmarket itself can be seen in a dip in the centre of the turf. The Heath racecourse and the Devil's Dyke lie in the background to the left. A coach in the middle, to the right, shows the old road running to Thetford and Bury.
orford1_tn.gif Orford castle and church by Turner, circa 1830 (water colour and body colour on blue paper; approximately 120 by 190mm; vignette; Pantzer Collection).This painting is one of a series he did of east coast landscapes. Turner produced most of his works in series, and A Wilton (The Life and Work of JMW Turner, 1979) suggests that this practice resulted from the desire by publishers to have topographical drawings in sets, so that they were easier to engrave.
orford2_tn.gif Drawing of Orford from the nineteenth century. Artist unknown.
sudbury3_tn.gif Map of Sudbury, 1831.
sudbury1_tn.gif Sudbury Grammar School, founded in 1491. There were lots of schools of ancient date in Suffolk, many of which were probably founded prior to the Chantries Act. As Sudbury was a flourishing small town in the later eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries it was able to support both this older grammar school, a charity school of 1724, and one founded by the schoolmistress Jane Carey, in 1754.
woodbridge_tn.gif Lime Kiln Quay at Woodbridge, by Thomas Churchyard (water colour; approximately 180 by 230mm; at Christchurch Mansion, Ipswich). Chuchyard was born in 1798 at Melton, Suffolk. His career as a county court lawyer meant that he travelled around the county frequently, and he used these journeys as an opportunity to make sketches. Two of his drawings were even exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1831.

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