New Results in X-ray Astronomy 2012

General Information

XMM-Newton


Continuing the series of annual one-day workshops on X-ray astronomy, this year's meeting will be held at the University of Leicester on Wednesday September 12th 2012.

The purpose of this series of workshops is to showcase the fascinating and important science emerging from current X-ray missions, developments in understanding the theory of cosmic X-ray sources, as well as the science that will drive the next generation of missions. In particular, this is an opportunity for junior members of the community to showcase their work and to meet members of other groups around the UK.

Content: The schedule is available here.

Where: Belvoir Park Suite, 2nd floor of the Charles Wilson building, University of Leicester main campus. See here for a map of the campus and information about getting to Leicester. (Parking on campus is extremely limited. Please email in advance [sav2 @ le.ac.uk] if you would like advice about parking for the meeting.)

When: Wednesday September 12th 2012, 10.45-17.00 (coffee from 10.00). There will be two breaks for coffee and one for lunch (a buffet lunch will be provided).

Registration: if you wish to attend the meeting please complete the registration form here. There is no registration fee. 

 

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Contact Details

Tel.: +44 (0)116 252 3506
Fax: +44 (0)116 252 2770

Department of Physics & Astronomy,
University of Leicester,
University Road,
Leicester, LE1 7RH,
United Kingdom.

Email:

For current students and general enquiries within UoL:
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