Andrew Fry's Research Interests

Andrew Fry is Director of Research for the College of Medicine, Biological Sciences and Psychology, and Professor of Cell Biology at the University of Leicester. The goal of his research is to identify novel and important mechanisms that control human cell division with a particular focus on regulation of the microtubule cytoskeleton. His ambition is to understand how microtubules and microtubule organizing centres are remodelled during progression through the cell cycle, including how primary cilia are assembled and resorbed upon entry into and exit from quiescence, and how interphase microtubule arrays are converted into a bipolar spindle upon transition into mitosis.

One specific aim of this research is to provide new insights into the complex organization of the mammalian centrosome, while much of his work involves studying how the eleven members of the human NEK serine/threonine kinase family control these events. His overarching purpose is to answer fundamental questions about microtubule biology and cell cycle control, discover how defects in these processes contribute to human disease, including cancer, and search for new and innovative therapies that exploit these discoveries.

His research approach uses state-of-the-art molecular, biochemical and cell biology techniques, most notably exploiting a wide range of fixed and live cell imaging modalities, while he collaborates extensively to answer questions of basic mechanisms and medical relevance with structural biologists, biophysicists, medicinal chemists and clinical academics. Finally, in his role as Director of Research, Professor Fry is keen to contribute to strategic developments that will create a discovery-enabling academic environment and improve training opportunities for the next generation of scientists.


This image shows a human cell in the process of mitosis as it divides in two. It was taken using a fluorescence microscope and reveals the chromosomes, on which the entire human genome is encoded. The chromosomes (blue) are moved into the centre of the cell through the action of fibrous microtubules (green) and attach to the chromosomes through specialised protein structures, called kinetochores (red). This stage of mitosis is known as metaphase, following which the duplicated chromosomes will be pulled apart to opposite ends of the cell before the cell cleaves in two.

 

This image shows a human cell in the process of mitosis as it divides in two. It was taken using a fluorescence microscope and reveals the chromosomes, on which the entire human genome is encoded. The chromosomes (blue) are moved into the centre of the cell through the action of fibrous microtubules (green) and attach to the chromosomes through specialised protein structures, called kinetochores (red). This stage of mitosis is known as metaphase, following which the duplicated chromosomes will be pulled apart to opposite ends of the cell before the cell cleaves in two.


Publications (since 2005)

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Contact Details

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology
Henry Wellcome Building
Lancaster Road
Leicester
LE1 7RH (Postal)

LE1 7HB (Sat Nav/Online maps)

T:  +44(0)116 229 7038
F:  +44(0)116 229 7123
MolCellBiol@le.ac.uk

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Redfearn Lecture 2017

To Be Confirmed