Labour Law

Within the Centre for European Law and Internationalisation, there is a group of academics with a specialist interest in labour law issues. The group meets regularly to exchange information on current labour law developments, to listen to and feedback on members’ papers and periodically organises activities in this field. Conferences were previously held on workplace rights to information and consultation, the right to strike and European equality law. The group is planning an ‘update on employment law’ in May 2013.

The School of Law is also a participant in the European Working Group on Labour Law. This is a scientific research network which includes (amongst others) the Law Departments of the Universities of Cassino, Castilla-La Mancha, Hannover, Leicester, Strasbourg and Utrecht.

Members

  • Pascale Lorber (for further information please contact pascale.lorber@le.ac.uk)
  • Oxana Golynker
  • Prof. Jill Marshall
  • Julie McClelland
  • Lisa Rodgers
  • Prof. Stephen Wood (School of Management)

  • News, events and current work

    Leicester academic becomes contributor to international blog on 'Regulating for Globalisation'

    Pascale Lorber was asked to join a team of legal experts to consider new developments in the field of labour law (such as Brexit, transnational challenges, impact of digitalisation on labour law).

    “Regulation for Globalization” is a Kluwer Law International blog. It is designed to address the significant changes taking place and the impact on rules of international business, especially in relation to trade law, EU law, and labour law. These forces are dramatic and the blog will highlight developments and provide opinion on the topics. Both academics and practitioners will offer fresh, high-quality and timely examination of the new rules facing international business.

    ‘Surrogacy and the Court of Justice of the European Union’ – 12 November, 2014

    Eugenia Caracciolo di Torella (School of Law, Leicester)

    Who should be able to use maternity related rights in case of surrogacy? The surrogate mother, the intended mother, or both? Such issues have recently been addresses by the EUCJ in two cases. These cases have highlighted that the EU is in urgent need to develop a set of legal rules that looks beyond how families are constructed and values and promotes the role of care and, ultimately, the best interests of the child.

    This event is part of the 2014 CELI seminar series, and organised by the Labour Law research cluster.

    Date: Wednesday, 12 November March, 1:00–3:00 pm

    Venue: Jan Grodecki Room, first floor, Fielding Johnson Building (Maps and directions)

    Contact: For more information please contact eugenia.caracciolo@le.ac.uk

    In Sickness and In Health? Illness and EU Employment Law – 21 May, 2014

    Professor Mark Bell, University of Leicester Law School

    Details

    Date: 12:30–13:00pm, 21 May, 2014

    Venue: Jan Grodecki Room, first floor, Fielding Johnson Building (Maps and directions)

    Contact: For more information please contact pascale.lorber@le.ac.uk

    European and Comparative Labour Law Student Seminar – Reconciling Work and Family Life

    On 1–4 April 2014, the law school hosted a student European and Comparative Labour Law seminar. The theme was ‘Reconciling Work and Family Life’. The event is part of the work undertaken by the European Working Group on Labour Law (EWL).

    European Working Group on Labour Law attendees 2014
    Staff and students at the European Working Group on Labour Law annual conference at the University of Leicester

    The three day seminar involved the presentation of students’ national reports on the legal framework applicable to maternity, paternity and parental leave as well as the opportunity to work flexibly. The following sessions required students from each national delegation to discuss, in a comparative context, a topic associated with the relevant law. On the final day, Dr Eugenia Caracciolo di Torella delivered a presentation on the European Union context and legal framework. The working groups subsequently presented their comparative report in a plenary session.

    A delegation of six represented the University of Leicester: Pascale Lorber and Professor Mark Bell represented the staff side while Helen Johnson, Andrew Wilson (LLM Employment law by distance learning), Ruksar Sattar (LLM) and Kay Ajibade (LLB).were students’ representatives.

    The other universities present were: Utrecht (The Netherlands), Castilla la Mancha (Spain), Cassino (Italy), Strasbourg (France).

    All national reports are available:

    Students were delighted at the opportunity to discuss a topical employment law subject. They also enjoyed working and socialising with European colleagues.

    The School of Law is a member of the EWL and is usually represented by Pascale Lorber and Mark Bell. The EWL is a research network which organises conferences and publishes research papers on European Labour law in a comparative context.

    ‘Annual conference of the European Working Group on Labour Law’ 1–4 April, 2014

    Professor Mark bell and Pascale Lorber will be running the annual conference of the European Working Group on Labour Law on the theme ‘Reconciling Work and Family Life in Europe: A Comparative Perspective’

    The event brings together academics and graduate students from 5 European universities. The sessions on Wednesday and Friday morning are open to staff and there are a limited number of places available for students. Please inform Teresa Rowe if you wish to attend.

    pdf file ‘Reconciling Work and Family Life in Europe: A Comparative Perspective’ programme

    Venue: Fielding Johnson, floor 1, room L66 (Maps and directions)

    ‘Migration and Labour Law’ – 12 March, 2014

    Professor Bernard Ryan (Leicester Law School)

    This paper will examine the potential contribution of labour standards reform to current public policy concerning labour migration in Britain.

    The background is the large increase in labour migration to the United Kingdom, with an estimated increase in the share of foreign-born workers from 7% in 1997 to 14% in 2013. There is evidence of the greater concentration of non-UK-born workers in lower-skilled occupations and sectors, due to a combination of shortages of resident labour supply and employer preference for some categories of migrant worker. There is also some evidence of negative impacts upon wage levels.

    These labour market developments have contributed to public opposition to current levels of labour migration, and accordingly to government attempts to formulate a labour migration policy which is simultaneously politically attractive and economically credible. The most recent focus has been on the Coalition’s attempt to reduce net annual migration below 100,000. Both the viability and the rationality of this target have been questioned, because it largely depends upon restrictions on skilled workers and students from outside the European Economic Area.

    An alternative approach, which the Labour Party has adopted since 2012, looks to labour standards reform within the migration policy debate. The background is that Britain's comparatively flexible system of labour market regulation tends to facilitate entry to the labour force by migrant workers. Labour Party proposals have concerned the enforcement of the minimum wage, the regulation and supervision of labour market intermediaries, and the equal treatment of settled and migrant workers by employers and agencies. To that list of possible subjects for reform, one might add the strengthening of collective regulation of terms and conditions, and of the overall system for supervision of compliance with labour standards.

    Reform in this area has the potential to address public concerns about labour migration in ways that the current policy of restricting non-EEA migration cannot. Such a reform need not be protectionist in either intention or design. Rather, it can aim at reflecting two historic goals of labour law: fair competition between categories of worker, and the protection of especially vulnerable groups against exploitative treatment.

    This event is part of the 2014 CELI seminar series, and organised by the Labour Law research cluster.

    Details

    Date: Wednesday, 12 March, 1:00–3:00 pm

    Venue: Jan Grodecki Room, first floor, Fielding Johnson Building (Maps and directions)

    Contact: For more information please contact katja.ziegler@le.ac.uk

    Employment Law Essentials – 23 May and 4 July 2014

    Managing employment issues (Sickness, redundancy, dismissal and (TUPE) regulations) for HR professionals in small and medium sized businesses
    Details

    Date: 23 May and 4 July, 2014

    Venue: College Court, University of Leicester  (Maps and directions)

    Fee: £50 per workshop

    CPD: 3 CPD points per day

    Booking: Employment Law Essentials

    Contact: teresa.rowe@le.ac.uk

    Sickness, redundancy, dismissal and transfer of undertakings (TUPE) regulations are some of the topics which managers have to deal with in the workplace. The Law School of the University of Leicester is running two half a day workshops for small and medium sized businesses on how to manage employment law issues at work.

    These workshops aim to provide an essential guide on how to manage these issues and to apply them to hypothetical scenarios. The sessions will also allow participants to explain what cases they come across and consider what training could be delivered to alleviate some of the problems encountered.

    The sessions are designed for professionals who deal with human resources and personnel matters in small commercial and not-for-profit companies.

    Themes

    Friday 4 July 2014

    9.30 Welcome and Introduction
    9.45 How to Manage Dismissal / Termination of Employment
    Ron Kane, employment law tutor and solicitor consultant
    11.05 Coffee / tea
    11.20 How to Manage Redundancies
    Pascale Lorber, School of Law
    12.40 Q&A and conclusions

    Details

    Date: 23 May and 4 July, 2014
    Venue: College Court, University of Leicester  (Maps and directions)
    Fee: £50 per workshop
    CPD: 3 CPD points per day
    Booking: Employment Law Essentials
    Contact: teresa.rowe@le.ac.uk

    Current Developments in Employment Law – 14 March, 2014

    This one day seminar is aimed at providing HR professionals and legal practitioners with an accessible and informative update on key recent developments in employment legislation and case-law.

    Key Themes

    • The Personal Scope of Employment Law
    • Family Friendly Policies
    • Equality Law
    • Access to Justice
    • Sickness Absence
    • Transfers of Undertakings

    Conference Details

    Date: 14 March, 2014, 10:00–16:15

    Venue: 4th Floor, Charles Wilson Building, University of Leicester

    Fee: £100 (£50 for alumni of the LLM Employment Law, University of Leicester)

    CPD: 5 CPD points are available for this event.

    For further information please contact Pascale Lorber or lawdl@le.ac.uk


    ‘Pregnancy, Maternity and Motherhood Rights: The cost of social reproduction’ – 17 October 2013

    Under The labour law research cluster, Annick Masselot (Canterbury, NZ, currently visiting Oxford) will talk about ‘Pregnancy, Maternity and Motherhood Rights: The cost of social reproduction’. The event will take place at 1:00 on Thursday 17th October in JGR. The talk is planned for 30 minutes with time afterwards for questions.

    As the presentation may be of interest to a larger audience than the labour lawyers, please let Pascale Lorber know if you wish to attend.

    pdf file Abstract and short biography (pdf)

    Current Developments in Employment Law – Friday 10 May 2013

    This one day seminar is aimed at providing HR professionals and legal practitioners with an accessible and informative update on key recent developments in employment legislation and case-law.

    Conference Details

    Venue: Garendon Room, Charles Wilson Building, University of Leicester

    Fee: £100 (£50 for alumni of the LLM Employment Law, University of Leicester)

    CPD Points: 5 CPD points are available for this event.

    Book now

    For further information please contact Pascale Lorber or Teresa Rowe

    Programme

    9:30–10:00 Registration and Tea/Coffee
    10:00–10:45 Welcome

    Professor Mark Bell and Pascale Lorber, School of Law, University of Leicester

    ‘Findings from the 2011 Workplace Employment Relations Survey’

    Professor Stephen Wood, School of Management, University of Leicester:

    10:45–11:30 ‘The Personal Scope of Employment Law’

    Lisa Rodgers, School of Law, University of Leicester

    11:30–11:45 Tea/Coffee
    11:45–12:30 ‘Transfers of Undertakings’

    Roger Silvers, Specialist in Employment Law, HR, H&S and Mediation

    12:30–13:15 Lunch
    13:15–14:45 ‘Religion and Belief at Work’

    Professor Gwyneth Pitt, School of Law, Kingston University

    ‘The Equality Act 2010: two steps forward, one step back?’

    Professor Mark Bell, School of Law, University of Leicester

    14:45–15:00 Tea/Coffee
    15:00–16:30 ‘Dismissal and Reforms to Employment Tribunals’

    David Mangan, School of Law, University of Leicester

    ‘Collective Labour Law’

    Pascale Lorber, Course Director, LLM Employment Law, University of Leicester


    Book now

    For further information please contact Pascale Lorber or Teresa Rowe

    International Labour Organisation

    In partnership with academics from the School of Law, the International Labour Organisation is providing its first training course on international labour standards and precarious workers (22-26 November 2010). This event will be held at the ILO International Training Centre in Turin, examining topics such as fixed-term and part-time work; home work; agency work; and disguised employment relationships. The ILO training courses are typically aimed at officials from Labour Ministries and trade unionists, often from the developing world.

    In a second piece of work, Virginia Mantouvalou was commissioned to produce a research report for the International Labour Organisation on 'Labour Inspection Sanctions and Remedies in the United Kingdom'. The report, part of a major international study, will be presented at a conference with experts from different jurisdictions in Venice in December 2010. In 2011 it will be published in a collection edited by the International Labour Organisation.

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