Dr James Moore

Lecturer in Modern British Social History

James Moore 2013

Contact Details

  • Tel: +44(0)116 2297531
  • Email: jm68@le.ac.uk
  • Office: Room 105, 6 Salisbury Road
  • Office Hours: Wednesday 12noon-1pm, Thursday 12noon-1pm
  • Dissertation Office Hours: Thursday 1pm-2pm
  • Research Day: Monday

Biography

I received my first degree in politics, philosophy and economics from Christ Church, Oxford and my PhD in British political culture from the University at Manchester.  I subsequently held an AHRB postdoctoral position at Manchester in urban cultural history.  I spent four years as the Deputy Director of Centre for Metropolitan History at the Institute of Historical Research, London, before obtaining a Senior Lectureship at the British University in Egypt.  I joined Leicester in September 2012.

Outside of university, I retain a strong, if somewhat despairing, interest in contemporary politics, having previously served as a borough councillor and parliamentary candidate.  I play the odd social game of cricket and recently captained Cairo Lions in the Egyptian Premier League.

Research

I am chiefly a historian of the ‘long nineteenth century’.  My main interests lie in the area of urban history and political culture of Britain and her empire.  Much of my work focuses on popular politics and urban governance, examining themes of citizenship, consent, identity and spatial regulation.  My publications also include work that explores cultural institutionalisation, the history of museums, the influence of the classical tradition and the politics of historical writing.

Teaching

Examples of modules I teach

Phd Supervision

I supervise students in wide range of topics in the field of British and overseas urban and political history.  Previous PhD completions have included studies of the cultural history of London underground, Jewish identities in London and Victorian museum environments. I currently supervise PhD students on two AHRC funded collaborative doctoral award projects – one on local and metropolitan identities (in conjunction with the Museum of London) and a second on private housing provision (in conjunction with English Heritage).

Recent Publications

  1. ‘“Marble Mad and Very Extravagant”: Henry Ince Blundell and the Politics of Cultural Reputation in Britain and Italy’ in R. Loretelli and F. O’Gorman, Britain and Italy in the Long Eighteenth Century: Literary and Art Theories (Cambridge SP, 2010)
  2. ‘Between Cosmopolitanism and Nationalism: The Strange Death of Liberal Alexandria’, Journal of Urban History, 10 (10) (2012), 1-22.

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