Dr Eliza Riedi

Lecturer in Imperial History

E Riedi

Contact

  • Office: Attenborough 605
  • Office hours: Tuesday, 9.30am-10.30am and Thursday, 2pm-3pm
  • Dissertation hour: Thursday 3pm-4pm
  • Tel: +44 (0)116 252 2807
  • Email: er48@le.ac.uk

Personal details

FHEA

I was educated at Selwyn College, Cambridge, and the University of St Andrews.

Teaching

Examples of undergraduate modules I teach:

 

Publications

  1. 'Assisting Mrs Tommy Atkins: Gender, Class, Philanthropy, and the Domestic Impact of the South African War, 1899-1902', Historical Journal 60 (2017), 745-69.
  2. ‘Imperialist Women and Conservative Activism in Early-Twentieth-Century Britain: the political world of Violet Milner’, Women’s History Review 22(2013), 930-53 http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09612025.2013.769383
  3. ‘The Women Pro-Boers: Gender, Peace and the Critique of Empire in the South African War’, Historical Research 86 (2013), pp. 92-115.
  4. Sport and the Military:  the British Armed Forces, 1880-1960 (Cambridge University Press, 2010) (jointly authored with Professor Tony Mason). Shortlisted for the 2011 Aberdare Literary Prize
  5. '"Leather" and the Fighting Spirit: Sport in the British Army in World War I' (jointly authored with Tony Mason), Canadian Journal of History, 41 (2006), pp. 485–516. Reprinted in W. Vamplew and M. Dyreson eds, Sport History (Sage Publications, 2016)
  6. 'British Widows of the South African War and the Origins of War Widows’ Pensions', Twentieth Century British History published online 23 Sept 2017 https://doi.org/10.1093/tcbh/hwx051

Research

Themes

My research centres mainly on gender and imperialism in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, in particular, the interactions between British women and the British Empire.

I also have a research interest in the history of sport in the British armed forces.

Current projects

My current project is a study of British women and imperial politics in the era of  'high imperialism', focusing on the South African War of 1899-1902.

The South African War in British Women's History is contracted to Manchester University Press and will appear in its Studies in Imperialism Series. It is funded by a British Academy Small Grant.

Supervision

I would be interested in supervising PhDs on

  • gender and imperialism; on nineteenth and twentieth-century British women's history, especially the history of feminism, suffrage, and women’s activism
  • the impact of the empire on Britain in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century, particularly the South African War

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