Dr Peter Jones

Research Associate

Dr Peter JonesContact Details

Email: pj109@le.ac.uk

 

Biography

 I studied as an undergraduate in Manchester, and followed this up with an MA in Modern Social History at the University of Lancaster. I was awarded my PhD by the University of Southampton in 2003. I am currently a Research Associate on the AHRC funded project, ‘In Their Own Write: Contesting the New Poor Law 1834-1900’

Teaching

As a full-time researcher I am not currently teaching, but I have taught extensively in the past and am looking forward to doing so again in the future. Between 2008 and 2011 I was a Lecturer in the History of Medicine at Oxford Brookes University between and taught on a wide range of courses, including (as course leader):

Undergraduate

• Disunited Kingdoms? 1708 to the Present

• Poverty and Welfare in England, 1601-1900

• Politics, Society and Culture in Modern Britain, 1815-1997

Postgraduate

• Patients and Practitioners, 1650-1850

• MA Dissertation Module

Supervision

I have supervised numerous masters dissertations, and have provided supervisory assistance for three successful PhD students. I was also the internal examiner for a successful PhD candidate at Oxford Brookes. I am currently the second supervisor for a PhD student working on the transition between the Old and New Poor Laws in Sussex.

Publications

  1. ‘The Long ‘Lost’ History of Bottom Trawling on the Coast of South-East England ca.1450-1650’, International Journal of Maritime History, 30:2 (2018, forthcoming)
  2. ‘‘We Cannot See Them...They Have Gone Out of Our Reach’: Narratives of Change in Scotland’s Great Firths ca.1770-1890’ in D. Worthington (ed.), The New Coastal History: Cultural and Environmental Perspectives from Scotland and Beyond (Palgrave Macmillan, 2017)
  3. ‘The New Poor Laws in Scotland, England and Wales: Comparative Perspectives’, Local Population Studies, 99:1 (2017), 31-41
  4. [With S.A. King] ‘Voices from the Far North: pauper letters and the provision of welfare in Sutherland, 1845-1900’, Journal of British Studies, 55:1 (2016), 76-98
  5. [With S.A. King] Obligation, Entitlement and Dispute Under the English Poor Laws 1600-1900 (Cambridge Scholars Press, 2015), including chapters:
    • [With S.A. King] ‘From Petition to Pauper Letter: the development of an epistolary form’, in P. Jones and S.A. King (eds.), Obligation, Entitlement and Dispute Under the English Poor Laws 1600-1900 (Cambridge Scholars Press, 2015)
    • [With S.A. King] ‘Obligation, entitlement and dispute: Navigating the English poor laws 1600-1900’ in P. Jones and S.A. King (eds.), Obligation, Entitlement and Dispute Under the English Poor Laws 1600-1900 (Cambridge Scholars Press, 2015)
    • ‘Widows, Work and Wantonness: pauper letters and the boundaries of entitlement under the English Old Poor Law’ in P. Jones and S.A. King (eds.), Obligation, Entitlement and Dispute Under the English Poor Laws 1600-1900 (Cambridge Scholars Press, 2015)
  6. [With S.A. King] ‘Testifying for the Poor: epistolary advocates and the negotiation of parochial relief in England, 1800-1834’, Journal of Social History, 49:4 (2015), 784-807
  7. [With A. Cathcart and D.C. Speirs] ‘Early Evidence of the Impact of Preindustrial Fishing on Fish Stocks from the Mid-west and South East Coastal Fisheries of Scotland in the 19th Century’, ICES Journal of Marine Science, 73:5 (2015), 1404-1414
  8. ‘Early Evidence of Overfishing in the Clyde: a cautionary tale’, Clyde Breakers: Firth of Clyde Forum Newsletter, 17 (2014), 10-14
  9. [With M. Evans] ‘‘A Stubborn, Intractable Body’: resistance to the workhouse in Wales, 1834-77’, Family and Community History, 17:2 (2014), 101-121
  10. ‘The True Life and History of Captain Swing: rhetorical construction and metonymy in a time of reform’ in S. Poole and A. Spicer (eds.), Captain Swing Reconsidered: Forty Years of History From Below (November 2010), 101-116
  11. ‘Finding Captain Swing: protest, parish relations and the state of the public mind in 1830’, International Review of Social History, 54 (2009), 429-458
  12. ‘‘I Cannot Keep My Place Without Being Deacent’: pauper letters, parish clothing and pragmatism in the south of England, 1750-1830’, Rural History, 20:1 (2009), 31-49
  13. ‘Swing, Speenhamland and Rural Social Relations: the ‘moral economy’ of the English crowd in the nineteenth century’, Social History, 32:3 (2007), 271-290
  14. ‘Clothing the Poor in Early-Nineteenth-Century England’, Textile History, 37:1 (2006), 17-37

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