Dr Bernard Attard

Lecturer in Economic History

Bernard AttardContact details

  • Tel: +44 (0)116 252 2798
  • Email: bpa1@le.ac.uk
  • Office: Attenborough 607
  • Office hours: Semester 1, Mondays 3pm -4pm and Thursday 2pm - 3pm
  • Dissertation office hour: Thursday, 4pm - 5pm
  • Research day: Friday

Personal details

BA (Hon), MA, DPhil, GradDip (Econ), FHEA

As an undergraduate I studied history and English literature at the University of Melbourne, where I also completed an MA in history, before beginning my doctoral research at Oxford University under the supervision of Dr Colin Newbury. While completing the doctorate, I was a research officer at the Centre for Metropolitan History in the Institute of Historical Research (1989-91), and then held a series of fixed contracts as a lecturer in economic history at the University of New England in Australia (1992-97). I then moved to London where I was the Lecturer in Australian Studies at the Menzies Centre, now in King’s College London (1997-98), and finally became a lecturer at the University of Leicester in 1998. I was the first Rydon Fellow at the Menzies Centre (1998) and have also been a visiting Fellow in the Department of History at the University of Melbourne (2002). I am a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

Administrative responsibilities

Examinations Officer

Teaching

My teaching broadly covers the history of the global economy from the late eighteenth century to the present, including introductory modules in the second year and a third-year option about the influence of economic factors on British imperial expansion before 1914. I also jointly coordinate a first-year module about how we became 'modern' people and am currently responsible for teaching introductory statistics to postgraduate students.

Examples of modules I teach:

The Imperial Economy: Britain and the Wider World 1815-1914

A World Connected: Welfare, Economy and Government Since 1945

Origins of a Global Economy,1783-1914

Publications

Edited books

  1. (With Carl Bridge), Between Empire and Nation: Australia's External Relations 1901-39, Melbourne: Australian Scholarly Publishing, 2000, xi + 258 pp.

Articles and book chapters

  1. 'Imperial central banks? The Bank of England, London & Westminister Bank, and the British Empire before 1914' in Olivier Feiertag and Michel Margiraz (eds), Les banques centrales et l'Etat-nation (Paris:Science Po Les Presses, 2016)
  2. 'In Search of Frank Keating’, UMA Bulletin, No. 34, March 2014, pp. 3–5.
  3. ‘Bridgeheads, “Colonial Places” and the Queensland Financial Crisis of 1866’, Journal of Imperial and Commonwealth History,  special issue, Finance, Empire and the British World, edited by Bernard Attard and  Andrew Dilley, Vol. 41, No. 1, March 2013, pp. 11–36’.
  4. (with Andrew Dilley) ‘ Finance, Empire and the British World’, Journal of Imperial and Commonwealth History, special issue, Finance, Empire and the British World, edited by Bernard Attard and  Andrew Dilley, Vol. 41, No. 1, March 2013, pp. 1-10.
  5. ‘The London Stock Exchange and the colonial market: the City, internationalisation and power’, in Christof Dejung and Niels P Petersson (eds), The Foundations of Worldwide Economic Integration: Power, Institutions, and Global Markets, 1850-1930(Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, 2013).
  6. ‘Wakefieldian investment and the birth of new societies, c. 1830 to 1930’, in Christopher Lloyd, Jacob Metzer and Richard Sutch (eds), Settler Economies in World History(Leiden: Brill, 2013).
  7. ‘Making the colonial state: development, debt and warfare in New Zealand, 1853-76’, Australian Economic History Review vol. 52, No. 2, July 2012, pp. 101-27.
  8. ‘Diplomacy by Default: Empire Foreign Policy and the High Commissioners during the 1920s’, in Carl Bridge, Frank Bongiorno and David Lee (eds), The High Commissioners: Australia’s Representatives in the United Kingdom, 1910-2010, Canberra: Australia, Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, 2010, pp. 56-68
  9. ‘The High Commissioners, Empire Development and Economic Diplomacy between the Wars’, in Carl Bridge, Frank Bongiorno and David Lee (eds), The High Commissioners: Australia’s Representatives in the United Kingdom, 1910-2010, Canberra: Australia, Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, 2010, pp. 69-81.
  10. ‘From Free-trade Imperialism to Structural Power: New Zealand and the Capital Market, 1856-68’, Journal of Imperial and Commonwealth History, vol. 35, no. 4, December 2007, pp. 505-527.
  11. ‘New Estimates of Australian Public Debt and Capital Raised in London, 1849-1914’, Australian Economic History Review, vol. 47, no. 2, July 2007, pp. 155-177.
  12. ‘Moral Suasion, Empire Borrowers and the New Issue Market during the 1920s’, in R. C. Michie and Philip Williamson (eds.), The British Government and the City of London in the Twentieth Century, Cambridge, 2004, pp. 195-214.
  13. ‘Making a Market: The Jobbers of the London Stock Exchange, 1800-1986’, Financial History Review, vol. 7, part 1, April 2000, pp. 5-24.
  14. ‘Le economie del Commonwealth’ (The economies of the Commonwealth), in Valerio Castronovo ed., Storia dell'economia mondiale; 4. Tra espansione e recessione, Bari: Editori Laterza,  2000, pp. 379-96.
  15. With Carl Bridge, ‘Introduction’, in Carl Bridge and Bernard Attard, eds., Between Empire and Nation: Australia's External Relations 1901-39, Melbourne: Australian Scholarly Publishing, 2000, pp. 1-5.
  16. ‘Financial Diplomacy’, in Carl Bridge and Bernard Attard, eds., Between Empire and Nation: Australia's External Relations 1901-39, Melbourne: Australian Scholarly Publishing, 2000, pp. 111-32.
  17. ‘The Limits of Influence: The Political Economy of Australian Commercial Policy after the Ottawa Conference’, Australian Historical Studies, vol. 29, no. 111, October, 1998, pp. 325-43.
  18. 'Andrew Fisher, the High Commissionership and the Collapse of Labor', Labour History, no. 68, May 1995, pp. 115-31.
  19. ‘The Jobbers of the London Stock Exchange: An Oral History’, Oral History, vol. 22, no. 1, 1994, pp. 43-48.
  20. ‘The Bank of England and the Origins of the Niemeyer Mission, 1921-30’, Australian Economic History Review, vol. 32, March 1992, no. 1, pp. 66-83.
  21. ‘Politics, Finance and Anglo-Australian Relations: Australian Borrowing in London, 1914-20’, Australian Journal of Politics and History, vol. 35, 1989, 2, pp. 142-63.

Entries in Oxford Dictionary of National Biography

  1. 'Ritchie of Dundee', 'Sir Esmond Durlacher', and 'Kit Hoare'.

DPhil thesis

The Australian High Commissioner’s Office: Politics and Anglo-Australian Relations, 1901-1939 (1991)

On-line articles

'The Economic History of Australia from 1788: An Introduction', EH.Net Encyclopedia, edited by Robert Whaples. March 4, 2006.

Data sets

  1. Statistics of Australian Public Debt and Capital Raised in London, 1842-1914 [computer file]. Colchester, Essex: UK Data Archive [distributor], November 2006. SN: 5435.
  2. Database of Australasian Government Loans Offered by Public Sale in London, 1857-1914 [computer file]. Colchester, Essex: UK Data Archive [distributor], October 2005. SN: 5222.

Oral history

Centre for Metropolitan History, ‘The Jobbing System of the London Stock Exchange: An Oral History’ (42 interviews with transcripts, 1989-91), C463: British Library National Sound Archive.

Book reviews

Dr Attard has reviewed works in the following areas: British imperial economy, financial history, the international economy, Australian political economy and British settler societies.

Research

Themes

My main research interest is in the political impact of British business and investment in the self-governing parts of the British Empire, particularly Australia and New Zealand, during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. This extends more widely to the influence of economic factors on British imperialism and informal power in the period. My doctoral research at the University of Oxford was a study of the Australian High Commission in London to 1939 and has resulted in a series of publications and a working paper about particular individuals (Andrew Fisher and S.M. Bruce), the High Commissioners during inter-war period, and the office’s general development. My practical introduction to financial history was as the Research Officer for an oral history of the jobbing system of the London Stock Exchange recorded by the Centre for Metropolitan History in the Institute of Historical Research. My major on-going research project is about Australia, New Zealand and international capital markets from the 1850s through to the Great Depression. Initial work was funded by ESRC Award Number R000223775.

Current projects

I am writing a book about British businessmen and investors and the rise of the Labor Party in Australia in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Supervision

International economy and debt in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries; British imperialism; Australian history.

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