Caroline Cupit

Caroline Morris staff photo 2015Honorary Research Fellow

Department of Health Sciences
University of Leicester
George Davies Centre
University Road
Leicester, LE1 7RH

Tel: 
Email: caroline.cupit@le.ac.uk

 

Biography

Caroline was awarded a doctorate from University of Leicester in December 2018. Her PhD was funded by The Health Foundation, and was an ethnographic study exploring the social organisation of cardiovascular disease prevention in English general practice. She is currently working as Research Fellow on a project with LOROS hospice, and is an honorary Research Fellow with University of Leicester.

Caroline is interested in the application of social science theory to the study of healthcare and healthcare improvement — particularly how healthcare policy is implemented in frontline practice, sometimes with unintended consequences. She is keen to explore the utility of ethnographic methods and has used institutional ethnography to privilege both the accounts of patients who experience difficulties as they interact with healthcare services, and frontline clinicians as they deliver care. As part of her PhD study, she followed contemporary movements, such as Preventing Overdiagnosis (POD), which aim to re-orientate the frontline practice of medicine.

Prior to starting her PhD, Caroline completed a master’s in Applied Health Research, having spent eight years working on service improvement projects for a local commissioning organisation and, most recently, for the regional Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care (CLAHRC). Her previous experience in commercial recruitment and welfare-to work sectors has influenced her current academic interests. She says “I have experience of working with a huge range of people, and this made me very conscious of the social issues affecting individual experiences of healthcare — including those which relate to the way services are provided.”

Publications

  1. Cupit C, Mackintosh N, Armstrong N. Using ethnography to study improving healthcare: reflections on the ‘ethnographic’ labelBMJ Quality & Safety 27: 258–260 (2018)
  2. PhD thesis:An ethnographic study of cardiovascular disease prevention: the social organisation of measures, knowledge, interventions and tensions in English general practice https://lra.le.ac.uk/handle/2381/43097 Key findings for policymakers available here.