Dr Elena Piletska

Lecturer in Bioanalytical Chemistry

Elena Piletska

Tel: +44 (0)116 294 4669
Email: ep219@le.ac.uk

Personal details

Industrial and academic collaborations

  • University of Greenwich (UK)
  • University of Kent (UK)
  • University of Perpignan (France)
  • Essen University (Germany)
  • Toximet Ltd.
  • GSK
  • Luminex
  • NOAA (USA)
  • Siemens (Germany)
  • Nitto Denko (Singapore)
  • Medicine for Malaria Venture (MMV)
  • Scottish Fisheries
  • International Paint Ltd.
  • Phytatec Ltd.
  • Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics (Ukraine)
  • Institute of Semiconductor Physics (Ukraine)
  • Shibaura Institute of Technology (Japan)
  • Xinjiang University (China)

Publications

Computational design, development and preparation of high-performance bespoke polymeric adsorbents for natural and synthetic compounds

  1. Piletsky S. A., Piletska E. V., Karim K., Foster G., Legge C. H., Turner A. P. F. (2003). Custom synthesis of molecular imprinted polymers for biotechnological application: Preparation of a polymer specific for tylosin. Analytica Chimica Acta, 504 (1), 123-130. DOI: 10.1016/S0003-2670(03)00814-6
  2. Piletska E., Karim K., Coker R., Piletsky S. (2010) Development of the custom polymeric materials specific for aflatoxin B1 and ochratoxin A for application with the ToxiQuant T1 sensor tool. Journal of Chromatography. A, 1217 (16), 2543-2547. DOI: 10.1016/j.chroma.2009.11.091
  3. Bakas I., Oujji N. B., Moczko E., Istamboulie G., Piletsky S., Piletska E., Ait-Ichou I., Ait-Addi E., Noguer T., Rouillon R. (2012). Molecular imprinting solid phase extraction for selective detection of methidathion in olive oil. Analytica Chimica Acta, 734, 99-105. DOI: 10.1016/j.aca.2012.05.013
  4. Piletska E. V., Burns R., Terry L. A., Piletsky S. A. (2012). Application of a molecularly imprinted polymer for the extraction of kukoamine A from potato peels. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 60 (1), 95-99. DOI: 10.1021/jf203669b
  5. Piletska E., Cowieson D., Legge C., Guerreiro A., Karim K., Piletsky S. (2013). Extraction of salbutamol using co-sintered molecularly imprinted polymers as a new format of solid-phase extraction, Analytical Methods, 5 (24), 6954-6959. DOI: 10.1039/C3AY41188E
  6. Piletska E., Karim K., Cutler M., Piletsky S. (2013). Development of the protocol for purification of artemisinin based on combination of commercial and computationally- designed adsorbents. Journal of Separation Science, 36 (2), 400-406. DOI: 10.1002/jssc.201200520
  7. Piletska E., Kumire J., Sergeyeva T., Piletsky S. (2013). Rational design and development of affinity adsorbents for analytical and biopharmaceutical applications. Journal of the Chinese Advanced Materials Society, 3, 229-244. DOI: 10.1080/22243682.2013.839207

Development of signal molecule-sequestering polymers (SSPs) for the attenuation of quorum sensing

  1. Piletska E. V., Stavroulakis G., Karim K., Whitcombe M. J., Chianella I., Sharma A., Eboigbodin K. E., Robinson G. K., Piletsky S. A. (2010). Attenuation of Vibrio fischeri quorum sensing using rationally designed polymers. Biomacromolecules, 11 (4), 975–980. DOI: 10.1021/bm901451j
  2. Piletska E. V., Stavroulakis G., Larcombe L. D., Whitcombe M. J., Primrose S., Sharma A., Robinson G. K., Piletsky S. A. (2011). Passive control of quorum sensing: Prevention of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation by imprinted polymers. Biomacromolecules, 12 (4), 1067-1071. DOI: 10.1021/bm101410q
  3. Robinson G., Piletsky S., Primrose S. Piletska O., Karim K., Whitcombe M., Chianella, I., Polymer Inhibitors of Quorum Sensing. WO2008087454

Applications of chloroplasts in biosensors and environmental monitoring

  1. Piletskaya E., Piletsky S., Lavrik N., Masuchi Y., Karube I. (1998). Towards the D1 protein application for the development of sensors specific for herbicides. Analytical Letters, 31 (15), 2577-2589. DOI: 10.1080/00032719808005328
  2. Piletskaya E.V., Piletsky S.A., Sergeyeva T.A., El’skaya A.V., Sozinov A.A., Marty J.-L., Rouillon R. (1999). Thylakoid Membranes -Based Test-System for Detecting of Trace Quantities of the Photosynthesis-Inhibiting Herbicides in Drinking Water. Analytica Chimica Acta, 391 (1), 1-7. DOI: 10.1016/S0003-2670(99)00233-0
  3. Piletskaya E.V., Piletsky S.A., El’skaya A.V., Sozinov A.A., Marty J.-L., Rouillon R. (1999). D1 protein - an effective substitute for immunoglobulins in ELISA for the detection of photosynthesis inhibiting herbicides. Analytica Chimica Acta, 398 (1), 49-56. DOI: 10.1016/S0003-2670(99)00370-0
  4. Piletska E., Piletsky S., Rouillon R. (2006). Application of Chloroplast D1 Protein in Biosensors for Monitoring Photosystem II-Inhibiting Herbicides, in “Biotechnological Applications of Photosynthetic Proteins: Biochips, Biosensors and Biodevices”, Landes Bioscience/Springer, Georgetown, NY; Eds. Giardi M. T. & Piletska E., 130-146. DOI: 10.1007/978-0-387-36672-2_12

Research

  • Computational design, development and preparation of high-performance bespoke polymeric adsorbents for natural and synthetic compounds
  • Development of signal molecule-sequestering polymers (SSPs) for the attenuation of quorum sensing
  • Chloroplasts and their application in sensors and environmental monitoring
  • Optimisation of the protocols for purification, separation and quantification of natural and synthetic compounds of interest

Computational design, development and preparation of high-performance bespoke polymeric adsorbents for natural and synthetic compounds

I have accumulated extensive experience in the development of high-affinity adsorbents for separation, extraction and purification of various natural and EP 1synthetic compounds. The list of custom-made materials that have been successfully developed includes specific adsorbents for: opiates (morphine, oripavine, codeine, thebaine); drugs of abuse (cocaine, methamphetamine, methadone, MDMA, GHB, THC); natural products (tylosin, artemisinin, abacavir, salbutamol, fluticasone); toxins (domoic acid, saxitoxin, neosaxitoxin, aflatoxin B1, ochratoxin A, zearalenone) and environmental pollutants (nonylphenol, triazine herbicides, triazinones and pesticides).

Analytical techniques used to characterise the custom adsorbents include surface area and pore size analysis (Quantachrome), particle size by dynamic light scattering (Nanosizer, Malvern), IR spectrometry (Nicolet), surface plasmon resonance (Biacore, GE Healthcare) and HPLC analysis with UV-vis, fluorescence (Agilent), RI (Shimadzu) and MS detectors (Waters).

Development of signal molecule-sequestering polymers (SSPs) for the attenuation of quorum sensing

It is known that both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria are able to communicate by the production and sensing of small signal molecules (autoinducers) which they secrete into their local environment. The ability of bacteria to sense its population density by this means is known as quorum sensing (QS). Certain phenotypic traits, in particular virulence factors, can therefore be expressed in a population density-dependent manner triggered by high concentrations of autoinducers. We have made the first molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP), capable of attenuating biofilm formation in the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, through specific sequestration of its signal molecule N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C12-AHL).

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The effect of polymers on biofilm formation in P. aeruginosa grown for 24 h on glass slides in the presence of 20 mg mL-1 of polymer: (a-c) surface distribution of biofilm in (a) control; (b) in the presence of Blank polymer; (c) in the presence of MIP (scale bars: 50 μm) and (d-f) the corresponding biofilm thickness shown by z-stack in: (d) control; (e) in the presence of the blank polymer and (f) in the presence of 20 mg mL-1 of MIP. Scale bars (d-f) are: 20 μm, 10 μm and 10 μm respectively.

The ability to disrupt bacterial communication and therefore prevent the production of toxins or the formation of difficult-to-treat biofilms is an important therapeutic target. If the signal molecule is adsorbed by polymers and removed from the system, bacterial communication is interrupted and virulent behaviour would not be triggered. Another important advantage of this approach is that removal of the signal molecules does not kill bacteria; therefore the selection pressure to develop resistance is reduced.

We are continuing our research into the control of Quorum Sensing by the development of catalytic polymers which would not only adsorb the signal molecules but also degrade them.

Applications of chloroplasts in biosensors and environmental monitoring

This topic is a continuation of my interest to chloroplasts and their components which started during the course of my PhD. A microtitre plate-based test-system for the evaluation of the concentration of photosystem-inhibiting herbicides and other environmental pollutants was developed in collaboration with the University of Perpignan (France) (INTAS project, EU). The work on purification of D1 herbicide-binding protein of chloroplasts was sponsored by JSPS (Japan).

Electron transport pathway through the Photosystem II. Arrow is pointing at the herbicide-biding site

Electron transport pathway through the Photosystem II. Arrow is pointing at the herbicide-biding site.

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Contact Details

Department of Chemistry
University of Leicester
Leicester, LE1 7RH, UK

Email: chemistry@le.ac.uk

Tel: [+44] (0)116 252 2100

Fax: [+44] (0)116 252 3789

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