Professor Simon Lilley

Professor of Information and OrganisationSimon Lilley

Contact details

  • Tel: +44 (0) 116 223 1261
  • Email: s.lilley@le.ac.uk
  • Office: Room 0.02, Heron House, Brookfield
  • Office hours: By appointment only

Personal details

PhD

I studied for my first degree, in psychology, at University College London. My PhD, which considered the impact of computerisation on the management of oil refineries, was awarded by Edinburgh University, being funded by the ESRC as part of their Programme on Information and Communication Technologies. I have taught previously at the Universities of Keele, Edinburgh, Glasgow and Lancaster, at the International Business School, Budapest and at the Manchester School of Management, UMIST. I joined the School of Management in 2003.

Teaching

I have delivered a range of modules across the School's portfolio.  I am currently teaching on third year undergraduate module MN3126 Cyber Psychology at Work; the postgraduate module MN7407 Management in Practice; and the supervision of postgraduate students' dissertations on module MN7410.

Administrative responsibilities

I have experience of leading virtually all of the school's administrative functions. I am currently the Management and Organisation Division's Year in Industry Tutor and a member of the School's Athena Swan Committee.

Research

Research interests turn around the relationships between (human) agency, technology and performance, particularly the ways in which such relationships can be understood through post-structural approaches to organisation. These concerns are reflected in a continuing focus upon the use of information technologies and strategic models in organisations and he is currently pursuing these themes through investigation of the regulation and conduct of financial and commodity derivatives trading and related innovations, such as Social Impact Bonds and Blockchain.  I am also exploring what intellectual developments around speculative realism might do to fields such as business ethics, management learning and our understanding of the entrepreneurial thought and action and developing his prior work around information and communication technologies to understand how those who have grown up as digital natives are navigating their increasingly virtual worlds.

Supervision

I currently supervises the following research students:

  • Roy Clinton
  • Arthur De Souza
  • Shiban Haithem
  • Luke Kowalski
  • Marisol Marin Rojas
  • Laura Martinez Gutierrez
  • Gerald Milanzi
  • Kola Odunan
  • Luis Eduardo Torres Lara

Publications

Gasparin M., Brown S.D., Green W., Hugill, A., Lilley, S., Quinn, M., Schinckus, C., Williams M., Zalasiewicz J. forthcoming. THE BUSINESS SCHOOL IN THE ANTHROPOCENE: PARASITE LOGIC AND PATAPHYSICAL REASONING FOR A WORKING EARTH. Academy of Management Learning and Education. In press. https://doi.org/10.5465/amle.2019.0199

Lilley, S. and Papadopoulos, D. (2014, in press) Material returns: Cultures of valuation, biofinancialisation and the autonomy of politics, Sociology.

Kavanagh, D., Lightfoot, G. and Lilley, S. (2014) Finance past, finance future: a brief exploration of te evolution of financial practices, Management and Organizational History, 9(2): 135 – 149.

Harvie, D., Lightfoot, G., Lilley, S. and Weir, K. (2014) Publisher, be damned! From price gouging to the open road, Prometheus: Critical Studies in Innovation, 31 (3): 229-239.

Lilley, S. and Lightfoot, G. (2013) ‘The Embodiment of Neoliberalism: Exploring the Roots and Limits of the Calculation of Arbitrage in the Entrepreneurial Function’, Sociological Review, 62(1): 68 – 89.

Brewis, J., Godfrey, R. and Lilley, S. (2012) ‘Biceps, Bitches and Borgs: Reading Jarhead’s Representation of the Construction of the (Masculine) Military Body’, Organization Studies, 33 (4 ): 541-562.

Harvie, D., Lightfoot, G., Lilley, S. and Weir, K. (2012) ‘What are we to do with feral publishers?’, Organization, 19(6): 905–914.

Klaes, M., Lightfoot, G. and Lilley, S. (2012) ‘Market masculinities and electronic trading’, in S. Long and B. Sievers (eds) Towards a Socioanalysis of Money, Finance and Capitalism, London: Routledge, pp. 349 -362.

Lightfoot, G. and Lilley, S. (2012) ‘Trading Belief: Moments of Exchange’, in P. Case, H. Höpfl and H. Letiche (eds) Belief and Organization, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 163 – 184.

Lilley, S. (2012) ‘How publishers feather their nests on open access to public money’, Times Higher Education Supplement, November 1, pp. 30 – 31.

Rhodes, C. and Lilley, S. (eds) (2012) Organizations and Popular Culture: Information, Representation and Transformation, London: Routledge.

Wisniewski, T., Lightfoot, G. and Lilley, S. (2012) ‘Speculating on Presidential Success: Exploring the Link between the Price-Earnings Ratio and Approval Ratings’, Journal of Economics and Finance, , 36 (1 ): 106-122.

Full listing of publications

Brown, S. D., Lilley, S., Lim, M. and Shukaitis, S. (2010) ‘The State of Things’, ephemera: theory and politics in organization, vol. 10, no. 2, pp. 90-94.

Cameron, A., Lightfoot, G., Lilley, S. and Brown, S. (2010) ‘Placing the ‘postsocial’ market: simulating space in the xeno-economy’, Marketing Theory, vol. 10, no. 3, pp. 1–13.

Godfrey, R. and Lilley, S. (2009) 'Visual consumption, collective memory and the representation of war', Consumption Markets & Culture, vol. 12, no. 4, pp. 275–299.

Bryman, A. and Lilley, S. (2009) 'Leadership Researchers on Leadership in Higher Education', Leadership, vol 5, iss 3, pp. 331 - 346.

Lilley, S. and McKinlay, A. (2009) 'Matters of fact/matters of fiction: imagining and implementing institutional change', Culture and Organization, vol. 15, no. 2, pp. 129 - 134.

Lilley, S. (2009) 'Organising time: contraction, synthesis, contemplation', Culture and Organization, vol. 15, no. 2., pp. 135 - 150.

Lightfoot, G., Lilley, S. and Pelzer, P. (2009) 'Motivating Risk? The sublime supplement of market exchange', Society and Business Review, vol. 4, iss. 2, pp. 110 - 122.

Armstrong, P. and Lilley, S. (2008) 'Practical Criticism and the Social Sciences', ephemera: theory and politics in organization, vol.8, no. 4, pp. 353-370.

Lilley, S. (2008) 'Pre-Paring Philanthropy: The Mimesis of Business and the Counterfactual Construction of Care', ephemera: theory and politics in organization, vol. 8, no. 2, pp. 157-175.

Lightfoot, G. and Lilley, S. (2007) 'The Ideology of Markets and the Practice of Policy: Objectivity, Control and the Objectionable', International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 27, no. 11/12, pp. 494 -499.

Lightfoot, G. and Lilley, S. (2007) 'The Glass Beads Of Global War: Dealing, Death And The Policy Analysis Market', Critical Perspectives on International Business, vol. 3, no. 1, pp. 83 - 100.

Kavanagh, D., Lightfoot, G. and Lilley, S. (2007) 'Running to Standstill: Late Modernity's Acceleration Fixation' Cultural Politics, vol. 3, no. 1, pp. 95 - 122.

Lilley, S. (2007) 'Humanism' in S. Clegg and J. Bailey (eds) International Encyclopedia of Organization Studies, London: Sage, pp. 607 - 10.

Lilley, S., Lightfoot, G., O' Donovan, P. and Kaulingfreks, R. (2006) 'A Parable of Parodies: Margins, Markets and Darwin's Garden', Culture and Organization, vol. 12, no. 4, pp. 281 - 291.

Lilley, S., Lightfoot, G. and Kavanagh, D. (2006) 'The End of the Shock of the New', Creativity and Innovation Management, vol. 15, no. 2, pp. 157 - 163.

Lilley, S. and Lightfoot, G. (2006) 'Trading Narratives', Organization, vol. 13, no. 3, pp. 369 - 391.
Case, P. Lilley, S. and Owens, T. (eds) (2006) The Speed of Organization, Copenhagen: Liber, Copenhagen Business School Press.

Case, P., Lilley, S. and Owens, T. (2006) 'You Shall Know Our Velocity', in P. Case, S. Lilley, and T. Owens (eds) The Speed of Organization, Copenhagen: Liber, Copenhagen Business School Press

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