Dr Don Egginton

Associate ProfessorDr. Don Egginton

AC211, Astley Clarke Building

Tel: +44 (0)116 252 2885

Email: de61@le.ac.uk

Personal details

I was first introduced to economics at A-level, where I had an amazing teacher who made the subject both interesting and fun. This made the subject really stand out, and encouraged me to study economics at university.

After studying an MA at Manchester University, I was employed as a research assistant at City University but I wanted to use Economics in the real world and went to work for British Telecom, followed by the Bank of England. This latter move started a long association with working in the financial sector of the economy.

After working in London for some time, I wanted a change. The University of Leicester seemed to fit the bill, as it seemed a pleasant place to work.

My economics training provided me with a combination of analytical and communication skills that allowed me to undertake a wide variety of research projects, presentations and briefings.

It's these skills that make economists stand out from other graduates. This combination of expertise is currently in demand by employers and will remain in demand. Even if they do not formally use economics analysis, economics graduates will always be able to analyse problems from a unique view point which might be summed up as: 'What’s the best we can do, given our limited resources?'

When not at work, I enjoy watching Coventry Blaze ice hockey team.

Teaching

Administrative responsibilities

  • Deputy Director of Examinations

Publications

"Keep it real!: a real-time UK macro data set", (with S Vahey and A Pick) Economics Letters, Volume 77, Issue 1, (2002)

"Testing the Efficiency and Rationality of City Forecasts", International Journal of Forecasting, Volume 15, Issue 1, (1999)

Research

  • International macroeconomics
  • Exchange rates
  • Monetary economics
  • Forecasting

My initial area of research was on the effects of the welfare policies on labour supply, i.e. how do factors such as unemployment benefits affect the supply of labour? I had studied welfare economics at university, so the interest originated from there.

My current research is focused on looking into exam performance and the variability of individual students’ performances within exams. In other words, the unevenness by which some students do better on some parts of an exam paper while others do better on other parts.

Through this research we might be able to provide individually tailored advice to students to improve their examination performance it has the potential to really help students.

Supervision

I am willing to supervise broadly in the area of applied international macroeconomics. I would be especially interested in supervising empirical research on the interaction of financial behaviour and the macroeconomy.

Share this page:

Contact Details

School of Business
University of Leicester
University Road
Leicester
LE1 7RH

ulsb@le.ac.uk

Accessibility

DisabledGo logo

The University of Leicester is committed to equal access to our facilities. DisabledGo has detailed accessibility guides for the Astley Clarke Building and the Ken Edwards Building.