Research Seminars

Date/Time/LocationDivisionTitleSpeakerAbstract

Date: 22 November 2017

Time: 1:30 - 3:00 pm

Location: AC 017

 

Economics

Minority Salience and Political Extremism Ingo Isphording

This paper empirically investigates how changes in the salience of a minority group affects the majority group's voting behaviour. We focus on Muslim communities and electoral results across German municipalities over the last thirty years. To establish causality, we exploit natural variation in the distance of the election date to the month of Ramadan, when Muslim communities become more visible to the general public. Our findings reveal an increased polarisation of the electorate: vote shares for both right and left-wing extremist parties become larger when the election date is closer to Ramadan and in municipalities where mosques are located. Using data on electoral districts in Berlin we show that the support for far-right (far-left) decreases (increases) with the distance to the mosque. Survey evidence highlights the importance of salience during Ramadan: respondents interviewed in the proximity of Ramadan have more negative attitudes towards Muslims and perceive a larger share of foreign-born persons living in their country compared with those surveyed later on. Finally, we show that the change in Muslims' salience further increases the likelihood of crimes against them.

Date: 29 November 2017

Time: 1:30 - 3:00pm

Location: AC 017

Economics The Strategy of Conquest (with Marcin Dziubinski and David Minarsch) Sanjeev Goyal

In the study of war, a recurring observation is that conflict between two opponents is shaped by third parties. The actions of these parties are in turn influenced by other proximate players. These considerations lead us to propose a model with multiple inter-connected opponents. We study the influence of resources, technology and the network of connections, on the dynamics of war and on the prospects of peace.

Date: 29 November 2017

Time: 3:30 - 5:30 pm

Location: ATT 208

Management & Organisation and Work & Employment Academic Arrhythmia: Disruption, Dissonance and Conflict in Early Academic Rhythms

Sarah Robinson, Olivier Ratle and Alex Bristow

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In this paper we examine the changing nature of academic labour and identity during, in particular, the early stages of academic career. Taking the lead from Frost & Taylor’s metaphor of rhythm and drawing on Lefebrve’s rhythmanalysis and Zerubavel’s sociology of time, we explore the rhythmic implications of the recent Higher Education (HE) changes for the experiences of this important group of academics, who represent the future of the profession. To do so, we draw on our international empirical study of 32 early-career academics (ECAs), which examines what is it like to be an ECA today. Our analysis identifies some continuities but also five major changes in early-career rhythms brought about by the growing audit culture in HE: the changing relative importance of rhythmic sets; temporal rigidification; fastening and intensification of pace; the encroachment of previously ‘senior’ rhythms into the early-career stage and internationalisation. We argue that all these changes lead to the rise of academic arrhythmia as a debilitating condition affecting academic work. We consider the consequences of the growing arrhythmia, our participants’ ways of coping with the associated rhythmic disruption, dissonance and conflict, and the ensuing implications for their own identity construction.

Date: 6 December 2017

Time: 1:30 - 3:00 pm

Location: AC 017

Economics Wealth Creation, Wealth Dilution and Population Dynamics Simone Valente

Wealth creation driven by research and development (R&D) investment and wealth dilution caused by disconnected generations interact with households. Fertility decisions, delivering a theory of sustained endogenous, output growth with a constant endogenous population level in the long run. Unlike traditional theories, our model fully abstracts from Malthusian mechanisms and provides a demography-based view of the long run where the ratios of key macroeconomic variables, consumption, labour incomes and financial assets are determined by demography and preferences, not by technology. Calibrating the model parameters on OECD data, we show that negative demographic shocks induced by barriers to immigration or increased reproduction costs may raise growth in the very long run, but reduce the welfare of a long sequence of generations by causing permanent reductions in labour income shares, as well as prolonged stagnation during the transition.

Date: 6 December 2017

Time: 3:30 - 5:30 pm

Location: ATT 208

Accounting The second most important pitch: How digital ventures navigate the endorsement economy Neil Pollock

This seminar addresses an evaluation hurdle which plays a major but unacknowledged role in the survival of new digital ventures. Much attention has been given to the first equity pitch given to investors. While important, this is only the initial step in securing a future for the enterprise. There are additional strategies that ventures must enact, that include making a ‘second pitch’ to industry analysts to secure their backing. These further pitches (and receiving the support of industry analysts) are crucial for helping new ventures grow and prosper but surprisingly little is known about them. We have gathered observational data on these exchanges and through applying insights from ‘Valuation Studies’, we analyse the factors that lead to certain ventures receiving these crucial analyst endorsements and others not.

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ulsb@le.ac.uk

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