LeCTIS Seminar Series 2018/19: Chinese Fansubbers - What Makes Them Survive So Far?

Posted by jcm22 at Oct 10, 2018 01:20 PM |
11 October 2018 - A study on the genre and style analysis of Chinese fansubbing translation, how it is different from professional translations and exploration of whether Chinese fansubbers have created their particular translation style.

Details

Date: Thursday, 11 October 2018
Time: 4.30pm-6pm
Location: Bennett Lecture Theatre 5, University of Leicester

Contact: Jiqing Dong


Speaker

He Yuan, University of Portsmouth, PhD candidate

Overview

Nowadays, with the rapid development of Chinese film and TV drama industry, Chinese film and TV censorship regulation has been widely debated. Without a classification system, the Chinese film and TV censorship requires all films and TV dramas that are shown in cinemas or public channels to be suitable for audiences of all age groups. Thus, the film and TV dramas that have been shown in China’s cinemas and public channels are increasingly homogenized, and the limitation of exhibition of foreign films and TV dramas is more and more severe. For seeking the variety of films and TV dramas (such as English films and TV dramas), Chinese audiences and fans have to look for them on the Internet because posting film and TV programme resources online is the way that bypass the Chinese film and TV censorship. Fansubbing is an important part of the consisting of online foreign film and TV programme resource system as fans of English films and TV dramas are the people who have been posting the resources online.

Chinese fansubbing has been translating plenty of English films and TV programmes and posting online for fans since the English films and TV dramas has been widely introduced to China around 2000. At the same time, they are becoming increasingly popular with fans because they not only provide variety of English films and TV dramas but also offer good quality subtitle translation. Since the Chinese film and TV censorship only allow the licensed translation studios production to be shown in cinemas or public channels, Chinese fansub could only be downloaded or watched online; also, since many English films and TV programmes that fansubbers translated could not meet the requirement of Chinese film and TV censorship regulation, fansub seems like the only choice for fans to watch them.

Because of the copyright issue, Chinese fansubbing is still wandering in the grey zone of Chinese film and TV censorship system. This research will be based on the questionnaire survey of Chinese fansubbing’s audience reception to discuss how Chinese fansubbing could survive under the pressure of Chinese film censorship and the future of Chinese fansubbing.

Biography

I am a PhD candidate from University of Portsmouth focusing on Audio-visual translation studies. My research subject concerns Chinese fansubbing translation studies, media studies and fandom studies. In particular, I am concentrating on the genre and style analysis of Chinese fansubbing translation, how it is different from professional translations and explore whether Chinese fansubbers have created their particular translation style. Also, I am exploring how have fansubbers’ productions been received by the general public in China.

I obtained my BA in Journalism/Broadcasting and Hosting Art in Henan University, China, 2012, and I gained MA in Film and Television Studies in Portsmouth in 2014 with the research interests of Film and TV Censorship in China, which inspired me to pursue PhD in Chinese fansubbing studies.

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