LeCTIS Seminar Series: How to Choose a Translation: Method and Beyond

Posted by yaj1 at Nov 17, 2020 01:55 PM |
Prof. Kirsten Malmkjær, University of Leicester

 

Abstract:

In the Translation Studies literature, translating has often been conceptualised as a problem solving activity. For example, when Krings (1986), Gerloff (1986; 1988) and Lörscher (1991) undertook their important explorations of translator cognition using the Think Aloud Protocol methodology, they chose to view their data as evidence of translation problems and of strategies for solving these. Similarly, Nord (1988/2005: 263) lists no fewer than forty nine different kinds of translation problem in alphabetical order from ‘Anaphora’ to ‘Topicality’. In my talk, I will adopt a different approach. Rather than viewing translating as an activity beset with problems and difficulties, I want to approach it as an activity that allows for translator choices and that invites translator creativity. Choice is a crucial translator activity and I will focus on several levels at which translators choose, illustrating these with a number of examples and suggesting where translators might look for guidance in making their choices.

Biography:

Kirsten Malmkjær is emeritus professor of translation studies at the University of Leicester. She is especially interested in translation theory – that is, in understanding the phenomenon that is translation, an interest that she has pursued throughout her academic career. In addition to teaching at Leicester, she has taught at the universities of Birmingham, Cambridge and Middlesex. Recent publications include the Routledge Handbook of Translation Studies and Linguistics (2018), the collection of articles, Key Cultural Texts in Translation, co-edited with Adriana Serban and Fransiska Louwagie (John Benjamins 2018) and Translation and Creativity, Routledge (2020).

Abstract:In the Translation Studies literature, translating has often been conceptualised as a problem solving activity. For example, when Krings (1986), Gerloff (1986; 1988) and Lörscher (1991) undertook their important explorations of translator cognition using the Think Aloud Protocol methodology, they chose to view their data as evidence of translation problems and of strategies for solving these. Similarly, Nord (1988/2005: 263) lists no fewer than forty nine different kinds of translation problem in alphabetical order from ‘Anaphora’ to ‘Topicality’. In my talk, I will adopt a different approach. Rather than viewing translating as an activity beset with problems and difficulties, I want to approach it as an activity that allows for translator choices and that invites translator creativity. Choice is a crucial translator activity and I will focus on several levels at which translators choose, illustrating these with a number of examples and suggesting where translators might look for guidance in making their choices.Biography:Kirsten Malmkjær is emeritus professor of translation studies at the University of Leicester. She is especially interested in translation theory – that is, in understanding the phenomenon that is translation, an interest that she has pursued throughout her academic career. In addition to teaching at Leicester, she has taught at the universities of Birmingham, Cambridge and Middlesex. Recent publications include the Routledge Handbook of Translation Studies and Linguistics (2018), the collection of articles, Key Cultural Texts in Translation, co-edited with Adriana Serban and Fransiska Louwagie (John Benjamins 2018) and Translation and Creativity, Routledge (2020).

 

Contact: Dr Sara Naylor

This is a free event but external visitors should contact us to request attendance.

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