Research interests

Research Themes

ARCHAEOLOGY AND CLASSICS IN THE COMMUNITY

I am leading a team of students and staff to make our research accessible, relevant and engaging for the widest possible audience. I have written a book for pupils and teachers: Life in the Roman World: Roman Leicester with Giacomo Savani and Mathew Morris. The book is suitable for KS3-5 (11-18) and is linked to resources for teachers entitled Life in the Roman World: Ratae Corieltavorum (Roman Leicester), which are suitable for KS2-3 (9-13).

The book and resources are linked to the national curriculum and can also be used to support the teaching of OCR's GCSE Classical Civilisation and GCSE Latin. The book can be purchased via the University online shop. The book and classroom resources are based on the research of the School of Archaeology and Ancient History, the excavations and publications of University of Leicester Archaeological Services (ULAS), objects in the Jewry Wall Museum Leicester and the Harborough Museum.

We are providing free classroom sets of the book to schools in Leicestershire and Rutland with the support of Classics for All and University of Leicester Research Impact Funding. If you would like a free set for your school, please email acc-cori@le.ac.uk to book a place on one of our free half-day training sessions, which explain how the book and resources can be used to support national curriculum subjects.

The resources are available for free download, and include session plans, activities and worksheets which explore the culturally plural nature of the Roman world, as well as introducing Latin in the context of the archaeology of Roman Leicester.

Find out more about the impact of our work in schools in the East Midlands.

 

THE HISTORY OF ARCHAEOLOGY

My current research examines the social and intellectual networks which underpinned the development of archaeology in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.

Scott, S. 2019. Vetusta Monumenta and Britain's Classical Past. Vetusta Monumenta: Ancient Monuments, A Digital Edition https://scalar.missouri.edu/vm/thematic-essay-roman-britain

Scott, S. 2019. Engavings of Three Roman Pavements found at Wellow. Vetusta Monumenta: Ancient Monuments, A Digital Edition https://scalar.missouri.edu/vm/vol1plates50-52-roman-pavements-wellow

Scott, S. 2017. 'Gratefully dedicated to the subscribers': The archaeological publishing projects and achievements of Charles Roach Smith. Internet Archaeology 45. https://doi.org/10.11141/ia.45.6

Scott, S. 2013c. Britain in the classical world: Samuel Lysons and the art of Roman Britain 1780-1820. Classical Receptions Journal, Advance Access pp. 1-44. doi:10.1093/crj/clt030

Scott, S. 2013b. Samuel Lysons and his circle: Art, science and the remains of Roman Britain. Bulletin of the History of Archaeology 23, 2, http://doi.org/10.5334/bha.2323, pp. 1-22.

 

THE HISTORY OF PUBLISHING IN ARCHAEOLOGY

This research highlights the potential of studying the early development of publishing in archaeology. It shows that a range of factors, most notably the individual interests of publishers and the price and format of books, impacted profoundly on the dissemination of archaeological knowledge.

Scott, S. 2013a. Pioneers, publishers and the dissemination of archaeological knowledge: A study of publishing in British archaeology 1816-1851. Internet Archaeology 35 http://intarch.ac.uk/journal/issue35/scott_index.html

 

ROMAN PROVINCIAL ART

This research critically examines traditional approaches to provincial art, and challenges the popular view that Roman provincial art is unworthy of serious study.

Scott, S. 2010. Review article: Local responses to Roman imperialism. American Journal of Archaeology 114, No. 3, pp.557-561. http://www.jstor.org/stable/25684295

Scott, S. 2006. Art and the archaeologist. World Archaeology 38, No. 4, pp. 628-643. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00438240600963213

Scott, S. and Webster, J. eds 2003. Roman Imperialism and Provincial Art. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 272 pp.

[An] ‘admirable endeavour to define new directions for study’. (Peter Stewart, Times Literary Supplement, 5 December 2003)

Scott, S. 2000. Art and Society in Fourth-Century Britain. Oxford University School of Archaeology Monograph 53. Oxford: Oxbow. 192 pp.

‘an admirable survey of materials, efficiently and elegantly presented…this is a strong, competent and eminently useful monograph’. (Jas Elsner Bryn Mawr Classical Review, March 2001).

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