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Blog Entry Bristol blows its top
Professor John Smellie, a volcanologist in the Geology Department, working with Peter Fretwell of the British Antarctic Survey, is using satellite images to document an eruption on one of the world’s most remote and least visited volcanoes: Mt Sourabaya, on Bristol Island in the sub-Antarctic South Sandwich Islands.
Located in Academic Departments / Geology / GeoBlog
Blog Entry Geology on Holiday
So where does a geologist go on holiday? Well we go anywhere and everywhere, geology is always beneath our feet and in the buildings that surround us. A quick survey of the landscape, the building materials and outcrops of rocks can reveal a lot. Here Professor Melanie Leng tells us about the geology she spotted in and around Manhattan, New York City…
Located in Academic Departments / Geology / GeoBlog
Blog Entry Three billion years of geological history in 2 weeks (and 4 seasons in 1 afternoon) – the Northwest Highlands field course by Peter Sayce, 3rd year MGeol student
If you are ever at a party and find yourself talking to someone who claims that they are “really looking forward to spending two weeks walking around the highlands of Scotland”, you are either talking to a geologist or a waterproof clothing salesman. Well as a geology student I would like to say that the second year field trip to the NW Highlands during Easter was one of the most enjoyable I have ever been on…
Located in Academic Departments / Geology / GeoBlog
Blog Entry At the end of my PhD on shale gas potential of the UKs Carboniferous mudstones by Sven Koenitzer
This summer Sven completed his PhD studies in the Geology Department at Leicester, here he tells us about his research over the last 3.5 years…
Located in Academic Departments / Geology / GeoBlog
Blog Entry Another Geology field trip blog from Almeria, this time by Maria Phillips
On 12th September 40 Geologists from the University of Leicester started their 2nd year of their degrees with a field trip to Almeria in Andalucía, Spain. We stayed at ‘Urra’, a fantastic field center near the village of Sorbas. After a welcoming meal cooked by Pablo and Norma, the Shady Grove bar was beckoning for ‘one of life’s many pleasures’ in the form of some local beer!
Located in Academic Departments / Geology / GeoBlog
Blog Entry James Davies, a former Geology student at the University of Leicester, talks about his current placement on the Cook Islands in the middle of the Pacific Ocean
James Davies, tell us more about what it's like working on the Cook Islands.
Located in Academic Departments / Geology / GeoBlog
Blog Entry Using “proxy” data to tell us about past climate change
One of the highlights of 2013 was publication of our research, in collaboration with the British Antarctic Survey and various UK Universities, on past climates along the Antarctic Peninsula, here Professor Melanie Leng tells us how climate change from 11,000 years ago to the last few decades has affected the Antarctic from proxy data…
Located in Academic Departments / Geology / GeoBlog
Blog Entry Reflections on the first year of my PhD by Jack Lacey
My PhD looks at using lake sediments to reconstruct Mediterranean climate over the past 2 million years. I study Lake Ohrid, on the Macedonia/Albania border, which is not only Europe’s oldest lake but also one of the world’s most biologically diverse in terms of how many unique species call it home. I investigate past environmental conditions within the larger framework of the SCOPSCO project, which looks at linking evolution and climate over the lake’s extended history.
Located in Academic Departments / Geology / GeoBlog
Blog Entry Fieldwork in Arctic Norway
3rd year student Grace Howe has just returned from a summer in Finnmark, Arctic Norway, with the British Exploring Society
Located in Academic Departments / Geology / GeoBlog
Blog Entry Largest Holocene volcanic eruption in Antarctica identified, dated and tracked right across the continent
Leicester Geology volcanologist, Professor John Smellie reports on his research on Deception Island, one of a handful of active volcanoes in the Antarctic.
Located in Academic Departments / Geology / GeoBlog

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