Welcome to the News Centre

The News Centre, which consists of the Press Office and Corporate Communications, welcomes news and event information from across the University and provides a central source for media enquiries, both proactively by contacting journalists about our latest research and events, and also reactively by providing expert commentators on a daily basis.

Headline News

Richard III Visitor Centre

University historian previews Richard III Visitor Centre

Review of 'Richard III - dynasty, death and discovery' by Professor Norman Housley.

News Highlights

Superman: Man of Steel and... super-powered solar panel?

Sport England grant to provide major boost for University sport

How India aided South Africa’s return to international cricket

Superman

Sport grant

cricket

Students calculate that Superman achieves the impossible – by breaking the fundamental physics law of conservation of energy.

Students will have more chances to play sport thanks to £226,032 of National Lottery funding from Sport England’s University Sport Activation Fund.

Longstanding cricketing ties between India and South Africa are the focus of a new exhibition curated by Dr Prashant Kidambi.

More news...

Listen

Memories of Joe Orton by his sister

In this podcast interview recorded by the News Centre, Leicester-born playwright Joe Orton's sister, Leonie Orton Barnett shares her memories of her infamous brother as the University celebrates the 50th anniversary of his first play, Entertaining Mr Sloane.

Please note: Some browsers do not support embedded SoundCloud files. Please visit our SoundCloud channel to hear this file.

More podcasts...

Watch

Graduation Selfie

King Richard III Visitor Centre

The University during WWI

The University's first ever graduation selfie with the Vice-Chancellor was caught on camera from Wednesday 16 July 2014.

A behind-the-scences video of the new Richard III Visitor Centre: 'King Richard III: Dynasty, Death and Discovery' which opens July 2014.

 

In this video, Colin Hyde describes what Leicester and the site of the University as we know it today, were like during the First World War.

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