Technofossils – an unprecedented legacy left behind by humans

Posted by er134 at Mar 25, 2014 11:31 AM |
New international study by academics from the University of Leicester highlights unique nature of fossil footprint left behind by mankind

Issued by University of Leicester Press Office on 25 March 2014

A new study by an international team of scientists, including Dr Jan Zalasiewicz and Professor Mark Williams of the University of Leicester’s Department of Geology, suggests that the fossil impact humans have made on the planet is vast and unprecedented in nature – and that there’s been nothing remotely like it since the Earth formed, over four and half billion years ago.

The study, entitled ‘The technofossil record of humans’ and published by SAGE in The Anthropocene Review, argues that, like dinosaurs, who left their bones and footprints behind for future generations to discover, humans will also leave a footprint behind – one made up of material goods unique to mankind that are so different from anything else produced by animals in the history of the Earth that they deserve their own name: technofossils.

Dr Zalasiewicz said: “Palaeontologists call preserved animal-made structures trace fossils.  Most animal species make only one – or at most a very few – different types of trace.  For example, dinosaurs made footprints and worms leave burrows.  Just one species, though, Homo sapiens, now manufactures literally millions of different types of traces that range from nano-scale to city-sized.

“Whereas trace fossils such as animal burrows changed their pattern with geological slowness, over millions of years, as the organisms that produced them evolved, the things that humans manufacture now evolve with lightning speed, as our factories bring new goods to the market each year – and make old ones obsolete. Many of the cast-off objects that now litter the landscape will become buried in sediment – and will be well on the way to becoming technofossils.”

The study suggests that humanity’s equivalent of the dinosaur’s footprint will be in the form of a wide array of technofossils such as motorways, cities, airports, toothbrushes, ballpoint pens and mobile phones – everything that we build or manufacture.

Professor Mark Williams added: “Millions of years from now, long after humans have gone, technofossils will be the defining imprint on the strata of the human epoch that people increasingly call the Anthropocene.  If any palaeontologists were to appear on – or visit – the Earth in the far geological future, they will think the technofossil layer more weird and wonderful, by far, than dinosaur bones.  It’s something to think about when you next park the wheelie bin at the end of the drive.”

The Anthropocene Review is a trans-disciplinary journal issued three times per year, bringing together peer-reviewed articles on all aspects of research pertaining to the Anthropocene. Its overall aim is to communicate clearly and across a wide range of disciplines and interests, the causes, history, nature and implications of a world in which human activities are integral to the functioning of the Earth System.

The study, ‘The technofossil record of humans’, can be found here: http://anr.sagepub.com/content/early/2014/01/06/2053019613514953.full.pdf

The study will appear in the April 2014 print issue of The Anthropocene Review.

Ends

Notes to Editors:

For more information please contact Dr Jan Zalasiewicz at jaz1@le.ac.uk or Professor Mark Williams at mri@le.ac.uk

The Anthropocene Review is a trans-disciplinary journal issued three times per year, bringing together peer-reviewed articles on all aspects of research pertaining to the Anthropocene, from earth and environmental sciences, social sciences, material sciences, and humanities. http://anr.sagepub.com/

SAGE is a leading international publisher of journals, books, and electronic media for academic, educational, and professional markets. Since 1965, SAGE has helped inform and educate a global community of scholars, practitioners, researchers, and students spanning a wide range of subject areas including business, humanities, social sciences, and science, technology, and medicine. An independent company, SAGE has principal offices in Los Angeles, London, New Delhi, Singapore and Washington DC. www.sagepublications.com

 

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