One in three people with Type 2 diabetes fail to take their medication, research shows

Posted by ap507 at Sep 06, 2017 11:55 AM |
Leicester Diabetes Centre research highlights how many people are not taking Type 2 diabetes drugs

More than one in three people with Type 2 diabetes fail to take their medication, according to a new study by researchers from the Leicester Diabetes Centre.

The research has revealed the potential for huge cost savings by getting people with Type 2 diabetes to stick to their recommended treatments and also the need for clearer guidance from prescribers.

The study, published in the Diabetes Care journal, revealed that 37.8 per cent of patients do not take their medication as prescribed by their healthcare professional potentially down to poor support and a lack of explanations about side effects, contributing to an increase in medical problems and higher costs to the NHS.

Co-Director of the LDC, Professor Kamlesh Khunti, Professor of Primary Care Diabetes and Vascular Medicine at the our University, who led the study, said: “Despite consistent improvements in the quality of care for diabetes in recent decades, it remains a constant challenge when it comes to premature death.

“It is plausible that efforts to improve adherence may prevent unplanned hospital visits and help to divert resources toward preventive medicine, which should be the cornerstone of any successful public health policy in diabetes.”

Co-Director of LDC, Professor Melanie Davies CBE, Professor of Diabetes Medicine and co-author of the paper, commented: “High-quality studies examining the effectiveness of interventions to improve adherence in chronic disease are needed to guide international efforts to curb the effects of the diabetes epidemic.

“It is important to help people to understand how their drugs work and why they should take them as this may increase the likelihood of people taking their medication regularly.”

The Leicester Diabetes Centre is an international centre of excellence in diabetes research, education and innovation and is led by Professors Khunti and Davies.

The research has been highlighted by national media outlets including the Daily Mail.