Life-saving drug should be given more widely in UK hospitals – new study

Posted by hct16 at Nov 19, 2012 04:03 PM |
Inexpensive treatment cuts risk of bleeding to death by 30 per cent
Life-saving drug should be given more widely in UK hospitals – new study

Professor Tim Coats

A new approach to treating injured patients could save 150 lives a year, according to a study involving over 13,000 patients.

The research into the administering of a simple and inexpensive treatment to patients who are injured and bleeding is being recommended to doctors in A&E units across the UK.

The research funded by the National Institute for Health Research Health Technology Assessment (NIHR HTA) Programme  identified that a drug, tranexamic acid, should be used across the spectrum of injured patients who are bleeding - not just those with the most severe bleeding.

The new study published in the BMJ, analyses data from the CRASH-2 trial,  demonstrating that  the drug could lower the risk of injury victims bleeding to death by up to 30 per cent.  The treatment is used by the military on injured soldiers – but the latest study highlights the need to increase the use of the drug on civilians in UK hospitals.

Professor Tim Coats, from the Department of Cardiovascular Sciences at the University of Leicester, and one of the principal investigators said, ‘At present in the UK, tranexamic acid is not used on the less severely injured patients – this approach is costing approximately 150 lives per year in the UK.

The study was funded by the National Institute for Health Research Health Technology Assessment Programme (09/22/165) and will be published in full in the Health Technology Assessment journal series.

 

Click here to listen to a podcast on: Tranexamic Acid (TXA), Crash 2, & Pragmatism with Tim Coats