Gallery 1

  • artist Alan Caine sitting in his studios surrounded by his artwork
  • Artist Graham Ensor sitting in his home studio surrounded by found objects
  • Artist Graham Ensor working in his studio with found objects
  • Artist Robert Thacker sitting in his home studio surrounded by his artwork
  • lady looking on a shelf full of industrial objects
  • two people standing in the middle of a museum warehouse
  • Industrial objects on a shelf

Attenborough Arts Centre will be developing a stimulating visual arts programme. The new, socially engaged exhibition and events programme will have a positive impact in the promotion and research of disability culture. Our visual arts programme will focus on art that is relevant, engaging and accessible, critical and progressive. Our exhibitions will have a social motivation exploring the changing role of contemporary art, its local and global relevance; supporting practical, aesthetic, and poetic new approaches to our society, our environment and our place within the two.

Attenborough Arts Centre is part of the University of Leicester’s Division of External Relations. Our new exhibition programme will significantly contribute to the University’s strategic research goals and wider public engagement. It will specifically explore issues of human identity and inter-cultural interactions, promote inter-discipline, attract high-calibre collaborators, and encourage new imaginative approaches that culminate in exhibition projects.

June

  • Memories of industry
  • Leicester: Memories of Industry

  • Public Preview, Friday 9 June 5.30pm - 8pm, FREE
  • Saturday 10 June - Sunday 20 August
  • Leicester: Memories of Industry is a major new exhibition in Galleries 1 & 2, exploring the influence of Leicester’s industrial legacy on its urban and natural landscapes. Seldom seen artefacts and contemporary art work come together in unexpected ways, provoking interaction between science, technology, philosophy and art.
  • The exhibitions have been developed by local artists Diane E Hall, Graham Ensor and Robert Thacker, alongside sound and visual artist Lucy Stevens. Collectively, their work will aim to reflect the cyclic nature of the landscape, from industrial use to the reestablishment of the natural environment.
  • Book now

September

  • two photographs next to each other, one black and white lady with painted hearts on her cheeks and then other a face wearing a mask
  • Laura Swanson and Claude Cahun Public Preview

  • Friday 8 September, 5.30pm - 8pm, FREE
  • Exhibition runs from Saturday September 9 - Sunday December 10
  • Laura Swanson: American photographer Laura Swanson makes her UK debut. Swanson explores the expectations of portraiture, the complications of representing and looking at different bodies, and how the cultural dominance of the selfie is shaping new perceptions of identity.
  • Claude Cahun: French photographer Claude Cahun (1894–1954) was a ground-breaking artist ahead of her time, challenging ideas of gender, identity and traditional portraiture in these now famous images. Born Lucy Schwob, she adopted the pseudonym in 1917 to free herself from the narrow confines of gender.
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  • image on a girl with a face mask
  • Laura Swanson

  • Saturday 9 September – Sunday 10 December
  • Exhibition opening Friday 8 September, 5.30pm - 8pm
  • Laura Swanson: American photographer Laura Swanson makes her UK debut. Swanson explores the expectations of portraiture, the complications of representing and looking at different bodies, and how the cultural dominance of the selfie is shaping new perceptions of identity.

  • First UK solo exhibition by American artist Laura Swanson. Gallery 1 present brand new, especially commissioned work by Laura Swanson: the photographic series, Beauty and Recluse, alongside recent work from her mixed-media series Uniforms (2015) and pieces from various past projects. Swanson explores the behaviour of looking at physical difference, working across media including drawing, installation, photography, and sculpture. In much of her work, the artist theatrically conceals her face or short statured body to question the expectations of portraiture, examine the motive to look at different bodies, and to reveal the performative nature of identity.

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