Bob Carter

Emeritus Professor

Professor Bob CarterBSc (London), MSocSci (Birmingham), PhD (Leicester)

Room: Attenborough Tower 502
Tel: +44 (0)11-6252-5359 (direct line)
Email: rc300@le.ac.uk

Research interests

I have a long standing interest in issues of racism and social theory and the politics of immigration (Carter, 2000, Realism and Racism: Concepts of Race in Sociological Research, London: Routledge). More recently, I’ve pursued research into issues of language and social identity which has incorporated some of my earlier interests in racism and ethnicity (Carter and Sealey, 2004, The Limits of Language: Applied Linguistics as Social Science, London: Continuum).

Further areas of research interest that have developed from my earlier work are the relationship between genomics, genealogies and contemporary notions of identity (see Ethnic and Racial Studies, 30(4), pp. 546-556) and the impact of current knowledge of human genetic variation on social categorisations of race and ethnicity. I have recently published, with Steve Fenton (University of Bristol), a critique of ethnicity thinking in sociology (Carter and Fenton, 2010, Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour, 40(1), pp. 1-18) and, with Simon Dyson (De Montfort University), a study of the ethnicisation of sickle cell disease (Carter, B , and Simon M. Dyson. 2011. "Territory, Ancestry and Descent: The Politics of Sickle Cell Disease Sociology 45(6):963-76)


I have also collaborated for the last two years with Nickie Charles (University of Warwick) on projects investigating human-nonhuman animal relations. We have co-edited (and contributed to) two edited collections: Nature, Society and Environmental Crisis (Wiley Blackwell, 2010) and Human and Other Animals: Critical Perspectives (Palgrave Macmillan, 2011). My current research explores notions of agency in contemporary debates about human-nonhuman relations.

Supervision interests

I have a pretty broad range of supervisory interests: Social theories of racism and ethnicity, the relations between sociology, nature and science, especially in the context of human-nonhuman relations (such as, for example, technologies and non-human animals, human enhancement, posthumanism and transhumanism) and realist social theory and methodologies.

Find out more about applying for a PhD

Listing of recent publications

External Profile

I previously worked at the University of Warwick, first at the Centre for Research in Ethnic Relations and then (after 2005) in the Department of Sociology. I received my PhD in Sociology from Leicester. I’ve taught undergraduate and postgraduate courses on, amongst other things, social theory, racism and ethnicity, philosophy of research and research methods and successfully supervised a number of PhD students.

I’ve been a member of the BSA (British Sociological Association) for twenty years and am a former member of the Editorial Board of Sociology. I set up the BSA Realism Study Group in 2004 and I review regularly for a range of journals, including the British Journal of Sociology, Sociology, Sociological Review, Theory, Culture and Society and Ethnic and Racial Studies.

On a lighter note, I’m also a keen cyclist (I’m the one who turns up on the strange looking Brompton bike – don’t hold this against me, I do have other, normal size bikes).

Current Teaching

Undergraduate

Postgraduate

  • Supervision of Masters and PhD theses
  • Research Philosophies Module (Doctoral Training Programme)

Current administrative duties

  • Deputy Head of Department
  • Director of PGR Degrees (Campus Based and DL PhD)
  • Department Seminar Programme Co-ordinator
Filed under:

Share this page:

Search our site
Contact Details

Sociology
University of Leicester
Bankfield House
132 New Walk
Leicester
LE1 7JA
United Kingdom

Phone: +44 (0)116 252 3863
Fax: +44 (0)116 252 5259

Undergraduate (and general)
enquiries: sociology@le.ac.uk

Postgraduate enquiries:
mcs-pgr@le.ac.uk

Staff contact details

Accessibility

DisabledGo logo

The University of Leicester is committed to equal access to our facilities. DisabledGo has a detailed accessibility guide for Bankfield House.