John Bridges: Mars Science Laboratory Blog

This blog is a record of my experiences and work during the Mars Science Laboratory mission, from the preparation, landing on August 5th 2012 Pacific Time, and onwards...

In addition to the blog, you can find some amazing videos and other content related to the mission, at:

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/multimedia/videos/index.cfm?v=49

John Bridges

25th February 2015 Sol 908

25th February 2015 Sol 908

Posted by jcb36 at Feb 25, 2015 08:48 AM |

Here is the latest, spectacular MAHLI selfie, made from a mosaic of the microscope imager pictures in January shortly befroe we drilled Mojave2.  The yellow place names are where we have drilled, including yestersol at Telegraph_Peak.

23rd February 2015 Sol 907

23rd February 2015 Sol 907

Posted by jcb36 at Feb 23, 2015 09:46 PM |

Our next drill target is Telegraph_Peak.  The Pahrump campaign is the most extensive so far, though this is the last planned drill hole  The image below is an example of the Navigation Camera mosaic used in planning, with names and numbers of various targets including Telegraph_Peak.

13th February 2015 Sol 897

13th February 2015 Sol 897

Posted by jcb36 at Feb 13, 2015 09:25 PM |

Now that we have finished drilling and analysing by APXS and ChemCam the Mojave2 drill tailings at Pahrump we have driven on or 'bumped' as we say to another target with a different composition determined on an earlier pass around Pahrump.

 

The documentation of the Curiosity tools continues .  This MastCam image shows how the sieve and scoop have still got a small amount of the Mojave2 drill powder within them.  Sieving the drilled material makes sure no large lumps get into the XRD CheMin or mass spectrometer SAM.  The scoop and sieve close together, then are rotated and the tailings fall through the sieve by gravity before being dropped into the solid inlets on the main body of the rover.

9th February 2015 Sol 893

9th February 2015 Sol 893

Posted by jcb36 at Feb 09, 2015 08:19 PM |

Now that our first Pahrump drill is completed one of the things we do is check the CheMIn inlet (which is in the top right of the NavCam image) to check for any debris, blockages etc.  This check is fine after the Mojave drill, though you can see that we are gradually accumulating dust on the surface of the rover.

Now we are choosing the next drill site in the Pahrump area.

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