John Bridges: Mars Science Laboratory Blog

This blog is a record of my experiences and work during the Mars Science Laboratory mission, from the preparation, landing on August 5th 2012 Pacific Time, and onwards...

In addition to the blog, you can find some amazing videos and other content related to the mission, at:

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/multimedia/videos/index.cfm?v=49

John Bridges

16th August 2016 Sol 1432

16th August 2016 Sol 1432

Posted by jcb36 at Aug 16, 2016 09:51 AM |

The Veins of Mars

http://thepoetryofscience.scienceblog.com/317/the-veins-of-mars/

Dr Samuel Illingworth of Manchester Metropolitan University has written a poem about the sulphate veins on Mars that we have just published about in Meteoritics and Planetary Science.

 

Your crater stands abandoned in the dirt,

As thirsty dreams evaporate for good;

Beneath your dusty surface pressures spurt,

Leaving behind deposits in the mud.

They burn you with their sulphate-silic blood,

And your horizons change beyond repair;

Then ground water appears like a lost flood,

Leaving behind pure sulphur in your lair.

We cut you with a knife and steal without a care.

12th August 2016 Sol 1428

12th August 2016 Sol 1428

Posted by jcb36 at Aug 12, 2016 03:35 PM |

Our latest drill hole - Marimba - has a distinctly reddish colour.  This probably means it has a lot of ferric oxide in it.  This is the sort of mineral signature we are expecting as we get close to Hematite Ridge and suggest the chemistry of the ancient groundwaters and related minerals are changing as we progress up Mt. Sharp.

 

29th July 2016 Sol 1415

29th July 2016 Sol 1415

Posted by jcb36 at Jul 29, 2016 05:42 PM |

We are getting some fantastic views of Murray Buttes, with Mt Sharp in the background.The Murray mudstone forms the low ground around the buttes.

19th July 2016 Sol 1405

19th July 2016 Sol 1405

Posted by jcb36 at Jul 19, 2016 12:10 PM |

MSL is back and working as normal. This MastCam picture shows that even at this early stage of the dust season (ls = 190 ie we haven't reached perihelion of Mars orbit yet) the crater rim is becoming obscured.

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