Dr Sally Horrocks

Lecturer in Modern British History

Sally HorrocksContact Details

  • Tel: +44 (0)116 252 5070
  • Email: smh4@le.ac.uk
  • Office: Attenborough 507
  • Office Hours: 2016/17 Semester 1 & Semester 2, Research Leave
  • Dissertation Office Hour: N/A
  • MA Office Hour: Email to arrange
  • Research Day: Thursday
  • British Library Day: Friday

Personal details

PhD

I studied History and Philosophy of Science at the University of Cambridge before spending two years teaching Chemistry at Waterford Kamhlaba United World College of Southern Africa in Swaziland. After returning to the UK I completed a PhD in the Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine (CHSTM) at the University of Manchester, where my research focused on scientists and food manufacturing in Britain before World War II and on industrial research and development in general.  After a year in the Department of History at Lancaster University I joined the Department of Economic and Social History at the University of Leicester. I have been book reviews editor of Economic History Review and have held a number of offices within the British Society for the History of Science of which I was President between 2010 and 2012.   I am senior academic advisor to the Oral History of British Science, a National Life Stories project in partnership with the British Library and along with Colin Hyde am working with BBC local radio stations in the East Midlands on their coverage of the centenary of the First World War..

British Society for the History of Science (BSHS)

Oral History of British Science (OHBS)

OHBS Blog

Research

Publications

  1. Sally Horrocks, 'British middle-class housewives and the two-person career, 1920-1960s' in Journal (2013)
  2. Sally Horrocks (with Gillian Murray), 'Women and work on film'  in Twentieth Century British History (2013)
  3. Sally Horrocks, 'Entertainment or Enlightenment? Science as news  in 1950s and 1960s Britain' in British Journal for the History of Science (2012)
  4. 'Nutrition science and the food and pharmaceutical industries in interwar Britain', in D. Smith (ed.), The History of Nutrition: institutional, professional, scientific and policy issues (London: Routledge, 1997), pp. 53-74.
  5. ‘Enthusiasm constrained? British industrial R&D and the transition from war to peace, 1942-51’, Business History 41 (1999), pp. 422-63.
  6. 'A promising pioneer profession?  women in industrial chemistry in inter-war Britain', British Journal for the History of Science 33 (2000), pp. 351-67.
  7. ‘R&D in British industry' in  Michael J. Lynskey and Seiichiro. Yonekura, ed., Entrepreneurship and Organisation: the role of the entrepreneur in organizational innovation, New York: Oxford University Press, 2002. Pp. 303-328
  8. ‘Industrial chemistry and its changing patrons at the University of Liverpool, 1926-1951’, Technology and Culture 48(2007), pp. 43- 66
  9. ‘The internationalization of science in a commercial context: research and development by overseas multinationals in Britain before the mid-1970s’, British Journal for the History of Science 40 (2007), pp. 227-250
  10. ‘Defence research and private industry in Britain: finding capacity for research in the electronics industry, 1940s-1960s’, Yearbook of European Administrative History, 20 (2008), pp. 165-185
  11. ‘Industrial Research and the employment of scientists in British industry before the 1970s’ in Richard Coopey and Peter Lyth, eds., Business in Britain in the Twentieth Century (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009), pp. 252-270.
  12. ‘The Royal Society, its Fellows and Industrial R&D in the mid-Twentieth Century’, Notes and Records of the Royal Society, 64 (2010), S31-41
  13. 'World War II, Post-war Reconstruction and British Women Chemists', Ambix, 58 (2011), pp. 150-70.

 

Articles in Refereed Journals and Publications- joint Author (50%)

 

T.S. Ashton Prize Article

 

 

  1. (with D. E. H. Edgerton), 'British industrial research and development before 1945', Economic History Review, 47, (1994), pp. 213-38.

     

    Reprinted in D. E. H. Edgerton, (ed.), Industrial Research and Innovation in Business (Cheltenham: Edward Elgar, 1996).

     

Articles in Non-Refereed Journals and Publications- sole Author

 

  1. ‘The Chemical Industry: the later nineteenth century’ in Sandro Petuccioli (editor in chief), Storia della Scienza, vol. VII, La Scienza dell’800, sez E, D.M. Knight, ed., Roma: Instituto dell Enciclopedia Italiana fondata da Giovanni Treccani, 2003.

Articles in Non Refereed Journals and Publications- joint Author (all 50%)

 

  1. (With David Smith), ‘Implications of the history of medicine for the history of diet and body dimensions’, in J. Komlos, and J. Baten (eds.), The Biological Standard of Living in Comparative Perspective (Frankfurt-a-M.: Fritz Steiner, 1998, pp. 497-508). ISBN 3 515 072209
  2. (with David Smith), ‘Defining perfect and not so perfect bodies: the rise and fall of the Dreyer method for the assessment of physique and fitness, 1918-1926’, in D. Maurer and J. Sobal (eds.), Interpreting Weight: The Social Management of Fatness and Thinness (New York: Aldine de Gruyter, 1999), pp. 74-94  ISBN 0 202 305775 (hb), 0 202 305783 (pb)

Encyclopaedias and Dictionaries etc

 

  1. essays on ‘Research and development’ and ‘Women in technology’ in A. Hessenbruch (ed.), Readers Guide to the History of Science (London: Fitzroy Dearborn, 2000) each essay c. 1,200 words ISBN 1 884964 29 X.
  2. entries in Joel Mokyr ed., Encyclopaedia of Economic History on ‘Food Processing Industry’, ‘Historical Overview’ and’ Technological Change’, in vol 2, New York: Oxford University Press, 2003
  3. Articles on Charles Goodeve, Walter Norman Howarth, William Wardlaw, and Magnus Pyke.in Colin Matthews ed., Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004
  4. My article on Magnus Pyke was reprinted in The Scotsman during October 2005
    Five Biographical essays, c 1250 words each for European Women in Chemistry Wiley,  2011

 

Supervision

Gender history, particularly in relation to gender and work; British science and technology in the 20th century;20th century British social and economic history, particularly of the English midlands;  topics that use moving image sources. The First World War and its legacy.

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