Dr Richard Thomas

rmt12.jpgReader in Archaeology

BA, Ph.D. (Birm.), FSA, FLS

Chair of the Association for Environmental Archaeology

Associate Editor for the International Journal of Paleopathology

International Committee member of the International Council for ArchaeoZoology (ICAZ)

Tel: 0116 252 3343

Email: rmt12@le.ac.uk

 

Richard Thomas read Ancient History and Archaeology at Birmingham University (1995-1998). He subsequently embarked on a PhD at Birmingham, studying diet, agriculture, and human-animal relations in late medieval and early modern England. Richard joined the School as Lecturer in Archaeology in September 2003. In 2010 he was promoted to Senior Lecturer and elected as a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of London and a Fellow of the Linnean Society of London. In 2013 he was elected as Chair of the Association for Environmental Archaeology and awarded a £1.94 million AHRC consortium grant entitled: Cultural and Scientific Perceptions of Human-Chicken Interactions. In 2014 Richard was elected to the international committee of the International Council for ArchaeoZoology (ICAZ) and in 2015 promoted to Reader.

Research

 

Teaching

Richard teaches at all three levels of undergraduate study to campus-based and distance learning students (level 1 – Fieldschool, Aims and Methods in Archaeology, Using Archaeological Evidence, World Archaeology AD; level 2 – Bradgate Park Fieldschool, Environmental Archaeology, Interpreting Archaeological Evidence, Medieval Towns, Self-Guided Fieldwork, Towards Modernity: Historical and Post-Medieval Archaeology; level 3 – Archaeological Practice, Archaeozoology; PGT - Advanced Forensic Science, Archaeozoology, Humans, Animals an Disease, Introduction to Forensic Archaeology). Richard also directs the MA Archaeology and is co-director of the Bradgate Park Fieldschool.

 

Selected Recent Publications

Appleby, J., Thomas, R. and Buikstra, J. 2015. Confidence in paleopathological diagnosis – a borrowed terminological framework. International Journal of Paleopathology 8: 19-21.

Gordon, R., Thomas, R., Foster, A. 2015. The health impact of selective breeding in poultry: a probable case of ‘creeper’ chicken (Gallus gallus) from 16th-century Chester, England. International Journal of Paleopathology 9: 1-7

Thomas, R. 2014. Tortoises and the exotic animal trade in Britain from medieval to ‘modern’. Testudo 8 (1): 56-68.

Thomas, R. and Fothergill, B. T. (eds) 2014. Animals, and their Bones, in the ‘Modern’ World (AD1750-1900). Anthropozoologica 49 (1).

Thomas, R., Holmes, M., and Morris, J. 2013. “So bigge as bigge may be”: tracking size and shape change in domestic livestock in London (AD 1220-1900). Journal of Archaeological Science 40: 3309-3325.

Thomas, R. and Worley, F. 2014. Recording pathology, pp. 34-35, in Baker, P. and Worley, F. (eds), Animal Bones and Archaeology: Guidelines for Best Practice. Portsmouth: English Heritage.

Thomas, R. and Worley, F. 2014. Recording non-metric traits, p. 36, in Baker, P. and Worley, F. (eds), Animal Bones and Archaeology: Guidelines for Best Practice. Portsmouth: English Heritage.

Thomas, R., Sadler, P. and Cooper, J. 2015. Developmental osteology of cross-bred red junglefowl (Gallus gallus L. 1758) and the Implications for Ageing Chickens from Archaeological Sites. International Journal of Osteoarchaeology.

Thomas, R. and Vann, S. 2015. Mammal and bird bones, pp. 145-171, in Rátkai, S. (ed.) Wigmore Castle, North Herefordshire. Excavations 1996 and 1998. Society for Medieval Archaeology Monograph 34. Maney, Leeds.

For a full list of publications see: http://leicester.academia.edu/RichardThomas

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