Publications

Books and edited volumes

Davies, J., Fabiš, M., Mainland, I., Richards, M. and Thomas, R. 2005. Diet and Health in Past Animal Populations: Current Research and Future Directions. Oxbow, Oxford.

Miklíková, Z. and Thomas, R. 2008. Current Research in Animal Palaeopathology: Proceedings of the Second Animal Palaeopathology Working Group Conference. British Archaeological Reports International Series S1844. Oxford: Archaeopress.

Stallibrass, S. and Thomas, R. 2008. Feeding the Roman Army: the Archaeology of Production and Supply in NW Europe. Oxford: Oxbow.

Thomas, R. 2005a. Animals, Economy and Status: The Integration of Zooarchaeological and Historical Evidence in the Study of Dudley Castle, West Midlands (c.1100-1750). British Archaeological Reports British Series 392. Archaeopress, Oxford.

Thomas, R. and Fothergill, B. T. (eds) 2014. Animals, and their Bones, in the ‘Modern’ World (AD1750-1900). Anthropozoologica 49 (1).

Articles

Albarella, U. and Thomas, R. 2002. They dined on crane: bird consumption, wild fowling and status in medieval England. Acta Zoologica Cracoviensia 45: 23-38.

Appleby, J., Thomas, R. and Buikstra, J. 2015. Confidence in paleopathological diagnosis – a borrowed terminological framework. International Journal of Paleopathology 8: 19-21.

Brickley, M. and Thomas, R. 2004. The young woman and her baby or the juvenile and their dog: re-interpreting osteological material from a Neolithic long barrow. Archaeological Journal 161: 1-10.

Browning, J., Harvey, J., and Thomas, R. 2016. Newtown Linford, Bradgate Park Field School. The Magazine 94: 9.

Crespo, C., Rissech, C., Thomas, R., Appleby, J., Juan, A., and Turbón, D. 2015. Sexual dimorphism of the pelvic girdle from 3D images based on a living Spanish sample from Castilla-La Mancha. Homo 66: 149-157. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jchb.2015.01.001

Daugnora, L. and Thomas, R. 2005. Horse burials from middle Lithuania: a palaeopathological investigation, pp. 67-74, in Davies, J., Fabiš, M., Mainland, I., Richards, M. and Thomas, R. (eds.), Diet And Health In Past Animal Populations: Current Research And Future Directions. Oxbow, Oxford.

Fabiš, M., Thomas, R., Páral, V. and Vondrák, D. 2008. Developmental anomaly of prehistoric roe deer dentition from Svodín, Slovakia, pp. 14-18, in Miklikova, Z. and Thomas, R. (eds.) Current Research in Animal Palaeopathology: Proceedings of the Second Animal Palaeopathology Working Group Conference. BAR International Series. Oxford: Archaeopress.

Fabiš, M. and Thomas, R. 2011. Not just cattle: cranial perforations revisited. International Journal of Osteoarchaeology 21: 347-350.

Fisher, A. and Thomas, R. 2012. Isotopic and zooarchaeological investigation of later medieval and post-medieval cattle husbandry at Dudley Castle, West Midlands. Environmental Archaeology 17 (2): 151-167.

Fothergill, B., Thomas, R., and Morris, J. 2012. Avian tibial dyschondroplasia in 19th-century turkey (Meleagris gallopavo L. 1758) remains from the Royal London Hospital. International Journal of Paleopathology 2 (4): 240-245.

Fudge, E. and Thomas, R. 2012. Man and beast: 'visiting your troops of cattle'. History Today 62 (12): 37-41.

Gordon, R., Thomas, R., Foster, A. 2015. The health impact of selective breeding in poultry: a probable case of ‘creeper’ chicken (Gallus gallus) from 16th-century Chester, England. International Journal of Paleopathology 9: 1-7 doi:10.1016/j.ijpp.2014.11.003

Gouldwell, A., Thomas, R. and Vann, S. 2015. Fish bones, pp. 172-173, in Rátkai, S. (ed.) Wigmore Castle, North Herefordshire. Excavations 1996 and 1998. Society for Medieval Archaeology Monograph 34. Maney, Leeds.

Hamilton, J. and Thomas, R. 2012. Pannage, pulses and pigs: isotopic and zooarchaeological evidence for changing pig management practices in 14th century England. Journal of Medieval Archaeology 56: 234-259.

Lawler, D.F., Widga, C. W., Rubin, D. A., Reetz, J., Leib, D., Evans, R. H., Tangredi, B. P., Thomas, R. M., Martin, T., Hildebolt, C., Smith, K., Sackman, J. E., Avery, J. G., Siegel, M., Smith, G.K. 2016. Differential diagnosis of curved vertebral spinous processes in archaeological domestic dog remains. Journal of Archaeological Science Reports 9: 54-63. DOI: 10.1016/j.jasrep.2016.06.042

Lloveras, L., Albizuri, S., Thomas, R., Rissech, C., Moreno-Garciá, M., Nadal, J., and Fernández, M. 2012. La paleopatología animal como indicador de la interacción entre comunidades humanas y faunísticas en las sociedades del pasado, pp. 345-348, in Turbón. D., Fañanás, L., Rissech, C., and Rosa, A. (eds), Biodiversidad humana y Evolución. Barcelona: Universidad de Barcelona.

Lloveras, L., Moreno-Garcia, M., Nadal, J., and Thomas, R. 2014. Blind test evaluation of accuracy in the identification and quantification of digestion corrosion damage on leporid bones. Quaternary International 330: 150-155 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.quaint.2013.07.033

Lloveras, L., Nadal, J., Moreno-Garcia, M., Thomas, R., Anglada, J., Martorell, C., and Vilasís, D. 2014. The role of the Egyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus) as a bone accumulator in cliff rock shelters: an analysis of modern bone nest assemblages from North-eastern Iberia. Journal of Archaeological Science 44: 76-90 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jas.2014.01.018

Lloveras, L., Thomas, R., Lourenço, R., Caro, J., and Dias, A. 2014 Understanding the taphonomic signature of Bonelli's Eagle (Aquila fasciata) on small prey remains obtained from modern nests and pellets. Journal of Archaeological Science 49: 455-471.

Lloveras, L., Maroto, J., Soler, J., Thomas, R., Nadal, J., Moreno-García, M., and Soler, N. early view. The role of small prey on hominid subsistence strategies from Early Upper Palaeolithic sites. The rabbits from the evolved Aurignacian level of Arbreda Cave. Journal of Quaternary Science DOI: 10.1002/jqs.2869

Mashkour, M., Radu, V., and Thomas, R. 2013. Animal bones, pp. 539-580, in Sauer, E.W., Rekavandi, H.O., Wilkinson, T.J., and Nokandeh, J. (eds), Persia's Imperial Power in late Antiquity: The Great Wall of Gorgan and the Frontier Landscapes of Sasanian Iran. British Institute of Persian Studies Monograph. Oxbow, Oxford.

Peters, J., Lebrasseur, O., Best, J., Miller, H., Fothergill, B. T., Dobney, K., Thomas, R.M., Maltby, M., Sykes, N., O’Connor, T., Collins, M., Larson, G. 2015. Early Holocene chicken domestication in northern China: a response to Xiang et al. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. www.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/pnas.1503579112

Sadler, P. and Thomas, R. 2008. Animal diseases in archaeology: a tale of two palaeopathologists. Association of Clinical Pathologists News Winter 2008: 20-22.

Smith, D., Nayyar, K., Schreve, D., Thomas, R., and Whitehouse, N. 2014. Can dung beetles from the palaeoecological & archaeological record indicate herd concentration and the identity of herbivores? Quaternary International 341: 119-130.

Stallibrass, S. and Thomas, R. 2008. Food for thought: what’s next on the menu? Pp. 146-169, in Stallibrass, S. and Thomas, R. (eds.), Feeding the Roman Army: the Archaeology of Production and Supply in NW Europe. Oxford: Oxbow.

Sykes, N., Ayton, G., Bowen, F., Baker, K., Baker, P., Carden, R. F., Dicken, C., Evans, J., Hoelzelb, A. R., Higham, T., Jones, R., Lambe, A., Liddiard, R., Madgwick, M., Miller, H., Rainsford, C., Sawyer, P., Thomas, R., Ward, C., Worley, F. 2016. Wild to domestic and back again: the dynamics of fallow deer management in medieval England. STAR: Science & Technology of Archaeological Research 2  http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/20548923.2016.1208027

Thomas, R. 2017. The zooarchaeology of animal ‘care’, pp. 169-188, in Powell, L., Southwell-Wright, W., and Gowland, R. (eds.), Care in the Past: Archaeological and Interdisciplinary Perspectives. Oxford: Oxbow Books.

Thomas, R. 2015. Food as material culture in a 19th-century ecclesiastical community, pp. 188-215, in Brooks, A. M. (ed.), Nineteenth-Century Material Culture Studies from Britain. Society for Historical Archaeology and University of Nebraska Press

Thomas, R. 2014. Tortoises and the exotic animal trade in Britain from medieval to ‘modern’. Testudo 8 (1): 56-68.

Thomas, R. 2012. Nonhuman paleopathology, pp. 652-666, in Buikstra, J. and Roberts, C. (eds), The Global History of Paleopathology: Pioneers and Prospects. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Thomas, R. 2011 The 19th-century animal bones from Stafford Castle, in Faunal Remains from Stafford CastleExcavations 1978-1998. doi:10.5284/1000401

Thomas, R. 2010. Translocated testudinidae: the earliest archaeological evidence for tortoises in Britain. Post-Medieval Archaeology 44/1: 165-171.

Thomas, R. 2009. Bones of contention: why later post-medieval assemblages of animal bones matter, pp. 133-148, in Horning, A. and Palmer, M. (eds.) Crossing Paths or Sharing Tracks: Future Directions in the Archaeological Study of Post-1550 Britain and Ireland. Woodbridge: Boydell and Brewer Ltd.

Thomas, R. 2008a. Supply-chain networks and the Roman invasion of Britain: a case study from Alchester, Oxfordshire, pp. 31-51, in Stallibrass, S. and Thomas, R. (eds.), Feeding the Roman Army: the Archaeology of Production and Supply in NW Europe. Oxford: Oxbow.

Thomas, R. 2008b. Diachronic trends in lower limb pathologies in later medieval and post-medieval cattle from Britain, pp. 187-201, in Grupe, G., McGlynn, G. and Peters, J. (eds.), Limping Together Through the Ages: Joint Afflictions and Bone Infections. Documenta Archaeobiologiae 6: 187-201.

Thomas, R. 2008c. Tortoises on the move: the first archaeological evidence for Testudo spp. in Britain, pp. 479-481, in Corti, C. (ed.) Herpetologia Sardiniae. Societas Herpetologica Italica 8.

Thomas, R. 2007a. Food and the maintenance of social boundaries in medieval England, pp. 130-151, in Twiss, K. (ed.), The Archaeology of Food and Identity. Center for Archaeological Investigations Occasional Publication No. 34, Carbondale.

Thomas, R. 2007b. Chasing the ideal? Ritualism, pragmatism and the later medieval hunt, pp. 125-148, in Pluskowski, A. (ed.), Breaking and Shaping Beastly Bodies: Animals as Material Culture in the Middle Ages. Oxbow, Oxford.

Thomas, R. 2007c. Animal bones, pp. 131-132, in Rekavandi, H. O., Sauer, E. W., Wilkinson, T., Tamak, E. S., Ainslie, R., Mahmoudi, M., Griffiths, S., Ershadi, M., Van Rensburg, J. J., Fattahi, M., Ratcliffe, J., Nokandeh, J., Nazifi, A., Thomas, R., Hoffmann, B. and Gale, R. (eds.), An imperial frontier of the Sasanian Empire: further fieldwork at the great wall of Gorgan. Iran XLIV 45: 95-136.

Thomas, R. 2006. Of books and bones: the integration of historical and zooarchaeological evidence in the study of medieval animal husbandry, pp. 17-26, in Maltby, M. (ed.), Integrating Zooarchaeology. Oxbow, Oxford.

Thomas, R. 2005b. Perceptions versus reality: changing attitudes towards pets in medieval and post-medieval England, pp. 95-105, in Pluskowski, A. (ed.), Just Skin and Bones? New Perspectives on Human-Animal Relations in the Historic Past. BAR International Series 1410. Archaeopress, Oxford.

Thomas, R. 2005c. Zooarchaeology, improvement and the British Agricultural Revolution. International Journal of Historical Archaeology 9 (2): 71-88.

Thomas, R. 2001. The Medieval management of fallow deer: a pathological line of enquiry, pp. 287-293, in La Verghetta, M. and Capasso, L. (eds.), Proceedings of the XIIIth European Meeting of the Palaeopathology Association Cheiti, Italy: 18th-23rd September 2000. S.p.A. Teramo, Italy.

Thomas, R. 1999a. Feasting at Worcester Cathedral in the 17th century: a zooarchaeological and historical investigation. Archaeological Journal 156: 342-358.

Thomas, R. 1999b. Ecclesiastical exuberance: feasting at Worcester Cathedral in the 17th century, pp. 4-9, in Guy, C. (ed.) Archaeology at Worcester Cathedral: Report of the Ninth Annual Symposium. Worcester: Worcester Cathedral.

Thomas, R. and Fothergill, B. T. 2014. Animals, and their bones, in the ‘modern’ world: a multi-scalar zooarchaeology. In Thomas, R. and Fothergill, B. (eds), Animals, and their Bones, in the ‘Modern’ World (AD1750-1900). Anthropozoologica 49 (1) : 11-18.

Thomas, R. and Grimm, J. 2011 The role of age, sex and body weight in the formation of ‘buttresses’ on sheep metatarsals. International Journal of Paleopathology 2: 121-125.

Thomas, R. and Holmes, M. 2010. From cattle to crab: 1000 years of ecclesiastical consumption at Worcester Cathedral, pp. 14-27, in Guy, C. (ed.), Archaeology at Worcester Cathedral: Report of the Nineteenth Annual Symposium March 2009. Worcester: Worcester Cathedral.

Thomas, R., Holmes, M., and Morris, J. 2013. “So bigge as bigge may be”: tracking size and shape change in domestic livestock in London (AD 1220-1900). Journal of Archaeological Science 40 (8): 3309-3325.

Thomas, R. and Johannsen, N. 2011. Articular lesions in cattle phalanges and their archaeological relevance. International Journal of Paleopathology 1: 43-54.

Thomas, R. and Locock, M. 2000. Food for the dogs? The consumption of horseflesh at Dudley Castle in the eighteenth century. Environmental Archaeology 5: 83-92.

Thomas, R. and McFadyen, L. 2010. Animals and Cotswold-Severn long-barrows: a re-examination. Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society 76: 95-113.

Thomas, R. and Mainland, I.  2005. Introduction: animal diet and health – current perspectives and future directions, pp. 1-7, in Davies, J., Fabiš, M., Mainland, I., Richards, M. and Thomas, R. (eds.), Diet And Health in Past Animal Populations: Current Research and Future Directions. Oxbow, Oxford.

Thomas, R. and Miklikova, Z. 2008. Introduction: current research in animal palaeopathology, pp. 1-2, in Miklikova, Z. and Thomas, R. (eds.) Current Research in Animal Palaeopathology: Proceedings of the Second Animal Palaeopathology Working Group Conference. BAR International Series. Oxford: Archaeopress.

Thomas, R. and Stallibrass, S. 2008. For starters: producing and supplying food to the army in the Roman north-west provinces, pp. 1-17, in Stallibrass, S. and Thomas, R. (eds.), Feeding the Roman Army: the Archaeology of Production and Supply in NW Europe. Oxford: Oxbow.

Thomas, R. and Vann, S. 2015. Mammal and bird bones, pp. 145-171, in Rátkai, S. (ed.) Wigmore Castle, North Herefordshire. Excavations 1996 and 1998. Society for Medieval Archaeology Monograph 34. Maney, Leeds.

Thomas, R. and Worley, F. 2014. Recording pathology, pp. 34-35, in Baker, P. and Worley, F. (eds), Animal Bones and Archaeology: Guidelines for Best Practice. Portsmouth: English Heritage.

Thomas, R. and Worley, F. 2014. Recording non-metric traits, p. 36, in Baker, P. and Worley, F. (eds), Animal Bones and Archaeology: Guidelines for Best Practice. Portsmouth: English Heritage.

Thomas, R., Browning, J., and Harvey, J. 2016. Bradgate Park, Newtown Linford. Transactions of the Leicestershire Archaeological and Historical Society 90:293-299.

Thomas, R., Sadler, P. and Cooper, J. 2016. Developmental osteology of cross-bred red junglefowl (Gallus gallus L. 1758) and the Implications for Ageing Chickens from Archaeological Sites. International Journal of Osteoarchaeology 26 (1): 176-188.

Tourigny, E., Thomas, R., Guiry, E., Earp, R., Allen, A., Rothenberger, J., and Lawler, D. 2016. An osteobiography of a 19th-century dog from Toronto, Canada. International Journal of Osteoarchaeology 26: 818–829. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/oa.2483/abstract

Vann, S. and Thomas, R. 2006. Humans, other animals and disease: a comparative approach towards the development of a standardised recording protocol for animal palaeopathology. Internet Archaeology 20 (http://intarch.ac.uk/journal/issue20/vannthomas_index.html)

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